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New arena at Will Rogers takes shape


The proposed Will Rogers Memorial Center arena continues to take shape as voters head for a Nov. 4 election to decide whether to approve new taxes to help pay for the $450 million facility.

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Cooking Class: Fort Worth chef brings home the gold

Toques off to Timothy Prefontaine. The executive chef at the iconic Fort Worth Club is currently the best in the nation, according to the American Culinary Federation. Prefontaine earned the title of 2014 U.S.A.’s Chef of the

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Fort Worth-based Woodmont plans $80M Hard Rock Hotel retail center

Woodmont Outlets of Fort Worth, an affiliate of The Woodmont Co., has partnered with Cherokee Nation Businesses for a proposed upscale retail development at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

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Fort Worth firm 'simplifies' advertising

Reaching customers requires more than price slashing and flashy ads. In today’s competitive marketplace, machines – not men and women – are essential to tapping new markets and

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Trinity Valley School leader to leave in May 2015

Gary Krahn, head of school for the past eight years at Trinity Valley School in Fort Worth, will leave his position in May 2015 when he and his wife Paula will move

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Sharing 91 years of the past through art

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J. Parker Ragland
Special to the Business Press

From May 17-29, Dolores “Toppy” Cochran’s artwork is on display at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Cochran is a 91-year-old amateur artist currently residing at the Sterling House of Richland Hills. Together, Wish of a Lifetime and Brookdale Senior Living made one of Cochran’s dreams come true – in particular, having her art displayed in the same museum as Georgia O’Keeffe, who is Cochran’s favorite artist.
“Art is my passion,” Cochran stated adamantly. “Stacy [Fuller] gave me a print of a Georgia O’Keeffe painting, and I tried to recreate it on a stone. I love all kinds of art; I want to try everything.”
In 2004, Cochran suffered from a stroke that left her partially paralyzed, but her resolve manifested most evidently in her response to the experience: painting, which she did initially to improve her movement but would later come to realize its important place in her life.
Cochran learned much about art by participating in one of the Amon Carter’s programs, “Sharing the Past Through Art.” Cochran said that Stacy Fuller, who leads the program, affected her greatly. “Stacy doesn’t give us the answers,” commented Cochran. “She makes us figure it out.” The program was developed to help individuals express themselves and connect to past experiences, and Cochran never misses. Fuller stressed that she can always expect to see Cochran at their meetings and how much of a joy it is to have her there.
“Art doesn’t have just one meaning,” said museum director Andrew J. Walker. “Its relationship is often so personal and often so directed toward those experiences that we all gather within ourselves as we travel through life. This is a program that really builds on that in a way that is magical, remarkable, and I think evidenced today in this wonderful exhibition.”
To date, Cochran has developed a body of work including more than 80 paintings, 24 of which are on display at the exhibition, entitled Toppy’s Passion. She has used acrylic, oil and watercolor and has painted on rock and canvas mediums. Her subjects include birds, flowers and landscapes; she draws inspiration from anything that can be seen outside her window. Cochran recited a moving story about how it became too difficult to take care of the fish pond in her backyard, so she painted the water and fish on stone to replace it.
At her reception on May 23, Cohran was “overwhelmed” by praise from friends, family, and the Amon Carter’s staff. Cochran stated, “It is so exciting to be able to show my art at such a prestigious museum. I am thrilled that this dream is coming true.”
Walker congratulated Cochran, “It’s hard to imagine … the panoplia of artists that you’ve joined that have now been exhibited at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, including Georgia O’Keeffe.”
 

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What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?