Join The Discussion

 

Obama calls for offshore drilling in Southeast

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday outlined a politically fraught plan for allowing oil and gas drilling offshore along parts of the Atlantic coast while imposing new restrictions on environmentally fragile waters off northern Alaska.

read more >

Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

read more >

Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

read more >

Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

Energy Transfer Partners LP of Dallas and Regency Energy Partners LP have entered into a definitive merger agreement.

read more >

Alliance's Hillwood Commons lands first tenant

A large title insurance, property valuation and settlement services company is the first tenant at Hillwood Commons I, an office complex at Alliance Town Center.

read more >

 

Manziel willing to share nickname with A&M's Hill

 

TOM WITHERS, AP Sports Writer

CLEVELAND (AP) – Johnny Manziel is ready to hand off his nickname. Or at least share it.

After Texas A&M sophomore quarterback Kenny Hill shredded No. 9 South Carolina for 511 yards passing on Thursday, breaking Manziel's single-game school record, the Cleveland Browns’ rookie QB acknowledged that his replacement in College Station had more than earned some respect and attention.

Manziel posted "KENNY FOOTBALL" on his Twitter account and later gave Hill a shout out during his news conference, saying, "Kenny Football, baby! Let's go!"

For any Texas A&M fans worried about how the Aggies would replace Manziel – the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy – Hill put them at ease. He completed 44 of 60 pass attempts with three touchdowns in his first collegiate start.

Manziel, who threw a TD pass and showed some of his typical flashiness in Cleveland's 33-13 exhibition win over Chicago, was asked if he could give up his "Football" nickname so easily.

"Hey," he said. "You throw for 511 yards ..."

Hill, though, would prefer making his own name.

"I don't really like 'Kenny Football,'" he said after upsetting the Gamecocks. Some fans and media had started calling him by his high school nickname, “King of the Hill,” which he said he preferred. 

Johnny Football, meanwhile, made more progress in his fourth preseason game as a pro. Manziel threw a 1-yard TD pass, ran for 55 yards – 22 coming on one run – and had a few of those head-scratching plays he seems to have patented.

Manziel's passing statistics were poor – 6 of 17 for 83 yards and a 71.4 rating – and he threw a couple of passes that wobbled their way toward their intended targets.

"I don't think I threw the ball particularly well," Manziel said. "I felt it came out of my hand a little funny with those first few throws and as the drives went on I felt like I threw it better. You have days like that where the ball feels a little different in your hand. I wish that I had some throws back, but I feel like I went to the right place a few times and I think I just needed to man-up and make the throw in order to give them a better ball. I was definitely a little upset on the field."

Manziel kept his celebrating to a minimum. He didn't flash the "money" gesture after his scoring pass to tight end Jim Dray. He did show some frustration when his first pass, a long throw to Gary Barnidge hit the tight end between the 8 and 2 on his jersey and fell incomplete.

Manziel knows drops happen, and he's not afraid to point out his own failures.

"There's times where I miss a throw and I'm sure the receiver's looking at me wondering the same thing, 'What the hell is he doing back there?'" Manziel said. "I know those guys are out there busting their tail for me. Accidents happen. If somebody drops one, you've got to pick them up and move on to the next play."

Manziel kept a couple plays alive with his feet. He danced around in the pocket, sidestepping Bears defensive linemen before hitting Nate Burleson for a 27-yard gain.

It was vintage Manziel: electrifying for fans, terrifying for a coach.

Mike Pettine's getting used to it.

"That's who he is," Cleveland's first-year coach said. "Somebody said on the sideline, 'There's Johnny being Johnny.' There was one play where it was no, no, no, yes, yes, yes that was just typical of his playmaking ability."

Manziel's performance came on the same day he took on a new persona: "Johnny Jamboogie."

He's featured in a TV commercial for Snickers in which Manziel, dressed in spandex tights and headband, is an aerobics instructor teaching a class of women. Manziel said he enjoyed making the spot.

"I was a little out of my comfort zone at the beginning," Manziel said. "It was no Joe Pesci.
 

 

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?