Join The Discussion

 

26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

read more >

UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

read more >

Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

read more >

Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

read more >

Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

read more >

 

Alex Mills: Colorado fights off calls for fracking ban

Alex Mills

Colorado is waking up to the realities of sensible development of its natural resources even though the anti-fossil fuel crowd continues its anti-development rhetoric.

A Colorado district court judge ruled recently that the city of Longmont cannot ban hydraulic fracturing because the ban directly conflicts with the state’s authority to regulate the oil and gas industry.

“The Court finds Article XVI of the Longmont Municipal Charter, which bans hydraulic fracturing and the storage and disposal of hydraulic fracturing waste in the City of Longmont, is invalid as preempted by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Act,” said Judge D.D. Mallard.

The ruling goes on to say that “Longmont’s ban on hydraulic fracturing prevents the efficient development and production of oil and gas resources.”

Additionally, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat, has been working hard to stop another effort to call a statewide vote to ban hydraulic fracturing.

Hickenlooper and the leader of the initiative, Democratic Congressman Jared Polis, announced last week that Polis will drop his support for two ballot initiatives that would limit hydraulic fracturing and in return Hickenlooper will establish a commission to advise the legislature about drilling complaints.

However, anti-development groups have not said if they will honor the negotiated settlement. They want to push forward with the initiative.

The politics of this issue has been raised to an extremely high level. In Colorado, particularly, the anti-development crowd has been very aggressive in pushing its movement to ban hydraulic fracturing. Today, about 90 percent of the wells drilled are fractured. Without the ability to fracture, drilling and production would decline dramatically. And so would the state’s economy and tax base.

Hickenlooper and U.S. Sen. Mark Udall, both Democrats, are facing strong opponents in the November general elections. Udall’s opponent, Cory Gardner, is pushing against the ban. He says Colorado has stringent regulations and he favors a “diverse energy portfolio.”

Here in Texas, meanwhile, the Denton City Council held a public hearing last month on a petition to ban hydraulic fracturing.

During the hearing, a former Texas Supreme Court Justice explained Texas mineral laws and the problems the city would encounter if it approved the ban. Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson notified the council that it could be sued by the state of Texas. State Sen. Craig Estes, who represents Denton, also advised the city council against endorsing the ban.

The council opted to let Denton voters decide the issue when they go to the polls Nov. 4.

Alex Mills is president of the Texas Alliance of Energy Producers.
 

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?