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Texas has old, new candidates to offer as presidential hopefuls

The Republican Party has long been riven between its establishment and conservative wings, a split that plays out every four years in the race for the White House.

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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

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Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

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Two Fort Worth Baylor medical properties acquired

Baylor Surgical Hospital of Fort Worth and Baylor Surgical Hospital Integrated Medical Facility are among three facilities acquired by Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II Inc.

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Rare summer relief for gasoline prices

 

JONATHAN FAHEY, AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK (AP) – The gasoline price roller coaster is running a strange course this summer.

August began with the lowest average gasoline price for this time of year since 2010. Just a few weeks ago, drivers were paying the highest gasoline July Fourth gasoline price in six years.

The average price of a gallon of gasoline is $3.52 after falling 16 cents over the last month. Prices may continue to slide in early August and post larger drops after Labor Day – as long as there are no hurricanes that halt production in the Gulf Coast or violence in the Middle East that disrupts crude supplies.

"We'll see some more drops, and clearly we'll be below $3.50 by Monday," says Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service and GasBuddy.com. "It's absolutely counter-intuitive."

Gasoline prices usually drop between Memorial Day and July Fourth after refiners have begun making more-expensive summer blends of gasoline. They then tend to rise between July Fourth and Labor Day as vacation drivers burn through supplies and traders worry about hurricanes.

This year, gasoline prices rose after Memorial Day because turmoil in Iraq, OPEC's second-biggest exporter, sent global crude prices rising. Oil rose to $107 per barrel on June 20 and gasoline reached $3.68 a gallon in late June.

Since then, fears that Iraqi oil exports would be blocked have subsided. Global supplies appear to be ample, offsetting any potential impact from U.S. and European sanctions against Russia, the world's biggest exporter outside of OPEC. And ongoing fighting between Israel and Hamas doesn't threaten oil production.

Crude oil fell Friday for the fifth day in a row, to $97.88 per barrel, its lowest price since early February.

At the same time, U.S. refiners have cranked up their operations, making higher-than-normal amounts of fuel and building supplies of gasoline. As a result, the national average gasoline price fell 30 out of 31 days last month, according to AAA, and posted their largest July decline in 6 years.
 

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