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Berkshire Hathaway company acquires Fort Worth firm

M&M Manufacturing, a producer of sheet metal products for the air distribution and ventilation market based in Fort Worth, has been acquired by MiTek Industries Inc., a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc.,

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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Fort Worth council adopts temporary zoning overlay for Stockyards

By Scott Nishimura
snishimura@bizpress.net

Fort Worth City Council members voted Tuesday for a temporary zoning overlay to regulate development in the Historic Stockyards, while the city begins work on a permanent set of codes meant to preserve the district’s flavor as a major proposed redevelopment proceeds.

The council voted 8-1 for the overlay, which covers the district east of North Main Street. The planned development overlay will require developers to submit a site plan for exterior changes and new construction.

Opponents asked the council to reject the overlay and instead aggressively work towards the development and implementation of form-based codes, a type of special-district zoning regulation that can address everything from buildings’ appearance and their relationship to each other, to height, parking, andscaping and lighting.

The temporary zoning overlay is “exactly what is needed,” Gary Brinkley, general manager of Stockyards Station, told the council, speaking for a partnership of Majestic Realty and Fort Worth’s Hickman family that is planning a $175 million redevelopment in the Stockyards.

“It just looks like the council has set itself up as the expert for what goes in the Stockyards,” former Councilman Steve Murrin, who has been publicly skeptical of the development plan and public process, said.

The city’s Zoning Commission voted 4-3 in June to recommend denial of the temporary overlay, sending the case to the councll.

The council approved the overlay on a motion by Sal Espino, who represents the North Side, and said it will afford a greater level of protection while the city works on form-based codes, which will replace the overlay.

Concho Minick, who runs Billy Bob’s Texas, told the council the Majestic-HIckman partnership won’t have any incentive to discuss form-based codes if the council approved the overlay.

“This issue has divided my family, my partners,” Minick, whose parents, the retired longtime Billy Bob’s operators Billy and Pam Minick, are in support of the Majestic-Hickman plan. The Minicks are in partnership in Billy Bob’s with several familiies, including the Hickmans.

“I just ask you to do something to help bring us together,” Minick told the council members.

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