Join The Discussion

 

Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

read more >

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

read more >

Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

read more >

Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

read more >

Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

read more >

Abbott takes big campaign cash lead over Davis

PAUL J. WEBER, Associated Press


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Democrat Wendy Davis remains a fundraising force in the Texas governor's race but begins the pivotal final push toward Election Day with substantially less money to spend than Republican Greg Abbott, according to new campaign finance figures released Tuesday.

Abbott began July sitting on nearly $36 million — nearly triple the cash Davis has on hand. Already a heavy underdog, the Fort Worth state senator is now confronting deficits not just in polls but financially in a big state where deep pockets are typically essential in elections.

Davis has raised $27 million since her filibuster in the Texas Capitol last summer over new abortion restrictions made her a star among Democrats. That's already more than what Democrat Bill White raised against Gov. Rick Perry in 2010, but Davis has burned through more than half that money before a single television ad has aired.

"There are the resources available, and will be raised, to compete in the fall," Davis spokesman Zac Petkanas said.

Abbott reported collecting $28.1 million since officially launching his campaign for governor almost exactly a year ago. But the longtime Texas attorney general had been quietly stockpiling money for years, building a bankroll in excess of $20 million before even announcing his candidacy.

The advantages of that head start are beginning to show.

"It's a big body of water for sure. It can be bigger depending on how Abbott spends it," said Bill Miller, an Austin lobbyist who has worked for Perry and is a longtime political consultant in Texas. "He owns the airwaves if he wants to."

Exactly who has been writing the biggest checks to Abbott and Davis in recent months wasn't immediately clear. Both campaigns made only their bottom-line numbers public before submitting itemized campaign finance reports that were due Tuesday to the Texas Ethics Commission.

Davis has garnered nationwide support while becoming among the most visible Democratic gubernatorial candidates in the country. She's made coast-to-coast fundraising trips, and more than one in four dollars she raised through the primaries this spring had come from out of state.

The new fundraising totals come two weeks after Davis headlined the Texas Democratic Convention, where she said it was "absurd" to suggest her chances of winning are fading. Her campaign Tuesday downplayed the gap in available cash and highlighted how Davis has attracted more than 140,000 individual donors.

Davis has not disclosed the identity of all her small donors in previous finance reports. Abbott's campaign attacked Davis again Tuesday over that omission, and said in a statement that Abbott was "overwhelmed by the support" he has received from donors who are 95 percent from Texas.

___

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?