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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

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Texas economist says Denton fracking ban would cost city and state millions

A leading Texas economist says the proposed hydraulic fracturing ban in Denton would cost the city and the state of Texas hundreds of millions of dollars in lost gross product.
The economic study by The Perryman Group of Waco analyzed the effects on the economy and tax revenue to local entities and the state if hydraulic fracturing was banned in Denton.


“The economic impact of a hydraulic fracturing ban in the city of Denton would be extremely detrimental,” said Texas economist Ray Perryman in a press release.
The Perryman Group just completed the study for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce. Denton city staff expect Tuesday evening's public hearing on the measure to draw a huge crowd to city hall.
“Over the next the 10 years, a hydraulic fracturing ban in the City of Denton would negatively impact the city of Denton’s local economy by $251.4 million in lost gross product; 2,077 lost person-years of employment; and put a severe financial strain on the city and its taxpayers from millions of dollars in lost oil and gas related revenue,” Perryman said.


A Colorado-based group has been circulating a competing petition in support of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.
The head of the agency that regulates the oil and gas industry in Texas wrote Denton city officials last week asking them to withhold their support for the petition. Outgoing Railroad Commission Chairman Barry Smitherman likened it to a "ban on drilling" that could injure the state's economy.
The Perryman study will be formally presented to the Denton City Council July 15 during at its public hearing on the proposed hydraulic fracturing ban. Less than 1,600 registered voters in the city of Denton have petitioned to have the Council either adopt a “hydraulic fracturing ban” or place the measure for voter consideration on the November 4, 2014 ballot.
Even if the council rejects the ban, Denton residents could vote on it in November.- Robert Francis, The Associated Press
 

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