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Super PAC Men: How political consultants took a Fort Worth oilman on a wild ride

The head of a Texas oil dynasty joined the parade of wealthy political donors, aiming to flip the Senate to Republicans. By the time consultants were done with him, the war chest was drained and fraud allegations were flying

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Bridge collapse on I-35 north of Austin

SALADO, Texas (AP) — Emergency crews are responding to a reported bridge collapse along an interstate in Central Texas.

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Latin-inspired restaurant set to open in downtown Fort Worth

Downtown Fort Worth’s dining scene is about to get spicier with the opening of a new restaurant featuring Latin-inspired coastal cuisine.

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Amazon begins Prime Now program in Dallas area

If you just have to have it now, as in one hour, you can, at least in the Dallas area, as Amazon.com Inc. announced Thursday it will offer Prime Now.

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Texas jobless rate falls as employers add workers

Texas unemployment fell to 4.3 percent during February for the sixth straight month of declines, the Texas Workforce Commission reported Friday.

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Texas economist says Denton fracking ban would cost city and state millions

A leading Texas economist says the proposed hydraulic fracturing ban in Denton would cost the city and the state of Texas hundreds of millions of dollars in lost gross product.
The economic study by The Perryman Group of Waco analyzed the effects on the economy and tax revenue to local entities and the state if hydraulic fracturing was banned in Denton.


“The economic impact of a hydraulic fracturing ban in the city of Denton would be extremely detrimental,” said Texas economist Ray Perryman in a press release.
The Perryman Group just completed the study for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce. Denton city staff expect Tuesday evening's public hearing on the measure to draw a huge crowd to city hall.
“Over the next the 10 years, a hydraulic fracturing ban in the City of Denton would negatively impact the city of Denton’s local economy by $251.4 million in lost gross product; 2,077 lost person-years of employment; and put a severe financial strain on the city and its taxpayers from millions of dollars in lost oil and gas related revenue,” Perryman said.


A Colorado-based group has been circulating a competing petition in support of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.
The head of the agency that regulates the oil and gas industry in Texas wrote Denton city officials last week asking them to withhold their support for the petition. Outgoing Railroad Commission Chairman Barry Smitherman likened it to a "ban on drilling" that could injure the state's economy.
The Perryman study will be formally presented to the Denton City Council July 15 during at its public hearing on the proposed hydraulic fracturing ban. Less than 1,600 registered voters in the city of Denton have petitioned to have the Council either adopt a “hydraulic fracturing ban” or place the measure for voter consideration on the November 4, 2014 ballot.
Even if the council rejects the ban, Denton residents could vote on it in November.- Robert Francis, The Associated Press
 

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