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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Clip art: Cutting edge barbershop creates a buzz in Fort Worth

Jonathan Morris is on a mission to create a better grooming experience for men.

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Grocers, retailers flocking to Southlake

With its economic development engine revving at full throttle, Southlake is about to welcome several major retail and commercial projects that underscore its image

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Great Woman of Texas; Stacie McDavid

“I’ve always been a maverick in a number of ways,” says businesswoman and philanthropist Stacie McDavid.

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It's Christmas tree time in the city of Fort Worth

Sundance Square will kick off the holidays with the lighting of the Christmas on Nov. 22 featuring a visit from a resident of the North Pole, musical and theatrical entertainment, as well as photo opportunities throughout the plaza.

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Texas economist says Denton fracking ban would cost city and state millions

A leading Texas economist says the proposed hydraulic fracturing ban in Denton would cost the city and the state of Texas hundreds of millions of dollars in lost gross product.
The economic study by The Perryman Group of Waco analyzed the effects on the economy and tax revenue to local entities and the state if hydraulic fracturing was banned in Denton.


“The economic impact of a hydraulic fracturing ban in the city of Denton would be extremely detrimental,” said Texas economist Ray Perryman in a press release.
The Perryman Group just completed the study for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce. Denton city staff expect Tuesday evening's public hearing on the measure to draw a huge crowd to city hall.
“Over the next the 10 years, a hydraulic fracturing ban in the City of Denton would negatively impact the city of Denton’s local economy by $251.4 million in lost gross product; 2,077 lost person-years of employment; and put a severe financial strain on the city and its taxpayers from millions of dollars in lost oil and gas related revenue,” Perryman said.


A Colorado-based group has been circulating a competing petition in support of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.
The head of the agency that regulates the oil and gas industry in Texas wrote Denton city officials last week asking them to withhold their support for the petition. Outgoing Railroad Commission Chairman Barry Smitherman likened it to a "ban on drilling" that could injure the state's economy.
The Perryman study will be formally presented to the Denton City Council July 15 during at its public hearing on the proposed hydraulic fracturing ban. Less than 1,600 registered voters in the city of Denton have petitioned to have the Council either adopt a “hydraulic fracturing ban” or place the measure for voter consideration on the November 4, 2014 ballot.
Even if the council rejects the ban, Denton residents could vote on it in November.- Robert Francis, The Associated Press
 

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?