Join The Discussion

 

Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

read more >

Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

read more >

Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

read more >

Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

read more >

Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

Energy Transfer Partners LP of Dallas and Regency Energy Partners LP have entered into a definitive merger agreement.

read more >

 

U.S. military grounds F-35 jets after fire

David Lerman
(c) 2014, Bloomberg News.
WASHINGTON — The U.S. military grounded its entire fleet of F-35 fighter jets made by Lockheed Martin as a safety precaution after a fire on one of the planes forced an aborted takeoff.

The Navy and Marine Corps versions of the jets were taken out of service, the Defense Department said in a statement Thursday, a week after the Air Force halted flights. Engine inspection results will determine when the jets can fly again, according to the statement.

The actions are a blow to the F-35, the costliest U.S. weapons system, which is being built while it remains under development.

Defense Department officials acted after an emergency at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida on June 23, when a fire in the rear of one plane forced the pilot to abort a takeoff. The cause is under investigation, according to the statement.

A decision will be made early next week on whether the F-35 can participate in international airshows in Britain this month, the Pentagon said in the statement. The Defense Department and Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed are counting on international sales to help pay the costs of the jet.

The F-35 has been plagued by a costly redesign, bulkhead cracks, excessive weight and delays in software. Building all 2,443 planes is projected to cost $398.6 billion, a 71 percent increase in inflation-adjusted dollars since the contract with Lockheed, the largest U.S. defense contractor, was signed in 2001.

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?