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Moves by Jeb Bush add to talk of 2016 candidacy

WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush's decision to release a policy-laden e-book and all his emails from his time as governor of Florida has further stoked expectations among his allies that he will launch a presidential bid.

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Ebby Halliday acquires Fort Worth’s Williams Trew

Williams Trew Real Estate of Fort Worth has been acquired by Dallas-based residential real estate brokerage Ebby Halliday Real Estate Inc.

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Meridian Bank Texas parent acquired by UMB Financial for $182.5M

Kansas City, Mo.-based UMB Financial Corp., the parent company of UMB Bank, said Dec. 15 it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Marquette Financial Companies in an all-stock transaction.

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Cousins Properties to sell 777 Main tower in downtown Fort Worth

Cousins Properties Inc. has confirmed plans to sell the 777 Main office tower in downtown Fort Worth, according to a news release from the Atlanta-based real estate investment firm.

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Glen Garden sale closes, distillery on tap

Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co. closed late Wednesday on its purchase of the historic Glen Garden Country Club in southeast Fort Worth, with plans to convert it into a whiskey distillery and bucolic visitor attraction.

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Lawmakers advance new name for state energy agency

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MICHAEL BRICK,Associated Press

 

 


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Seeking to clarify the mission of the agency that primarily regulates the oil industry in Texas, state senators on Thursday approved a name change.

Under a bill unanimously approved by the Texas Senate, the Railroad Commission would become the Texas Energy Resources Commission.

Founded in 1891 to regulate the railroads, the agency quickly extended its powers amid the big oil discoveries of the early 20th century. It has become a powerful national force influencing oil supplies and prices.

Last year, in a review of the agency's work, state analysts from the Sunset Advisory Commission reported significant new challenges on the horizon with the expansion of the drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing. They included complex matters of safety, pollution and the potential for damage to state infrastructure. But they opened their report with a more pedestrian issue.

"Despite its misleading name, the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the state's oil and gas industry and has nothing to do with railroads," the analysts wrote. "The clarity of its name matters now more than ever as the Commission's job takes center stage in overseeing an unprecedented expansion of oil and natural gas drilling in the state."

While the bill would also give the commission new powers to charge fees and enforce regulations, senators seemed more concerned with the name issue.

Sen. Craig Estes, R-Wichita Falls, offered an amendment that would have changed the name to the Texas Energy Commission.

"I think it's shorter and cleaner," he said.

But he withdrew his amendment, deferring to a different name idea from Sen. Glenn Hegar, R-Katy, who suggested the Texas Department of Oil and Gas.

After a series of closely contested votes, during which the chamber grew uncharacteristically quiet, Sen. Robert Nichols, R-Jacksonville, managed to win the day on behalf of his favored name.

The proposal still must gain the approval of the House.

The new name, Nichols wrote in a bill analysis, should reduce confusion among voters.


 

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