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Trademark closes on 63-acre Waterside site in Fort Worth

Construction begins Oct. 20 on the development, to be anchored by a Whole Foods Market.

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UPDATE: $215M hotel, indoor ski project planned for Grand Prairie

Officials in Grand Prairie are expected later today to announce a $215 million project that will include a Hard Rock Hotel and an indoor ski facility.

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Two Fort Worth council members propose temporary single-family moratorium around TCU

The moratorium would apply to new permits for single-family homes around TCU, and give the city time to figure out what to do with a controversial proposed overlay in several neighborhoods around the university.

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Lawmakers advance new name for state energy agency

Add right column body text here.

MICHAEL BRICK,Associated Press

 

 


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Seeking to clarify the mission of the agency that primarily regulates the oil industry in Texas, state senators on Thursday approved a name change.

Under a bill unanimously approved by the Texas Senate, the Railroad Commission would become the Texas Energy Resources Commission.

Founded in 1891 to regulate the railroads, the agency quickly extended its powers amid the big oil discoveries of the early 20th century. It has become a powerful national force influencing oil supplies and prices.

Last year, in a review of the agency's work, state analysts from the Sunset Advisory Commission reported significant new challenges on the horizon with the expansion of the drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing. They included complex matters of safety, pollution and the potential for damage to state infrastructure. But they opened their report with a more pedestrian issue.

"Despite its misleading name, the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the state's oil and gas industry and has nothing to do with railroads," the analysts wrote. "The clarity of its name matters now more than ever as the Commission's job takes center stage in overseeing an unprecedented expansion of oil and natural gas drilling in the state."

While the bill would also give the commission new powers to charge fees and enforce regulations, senators seemed more concerned with the name issue.

Sen. Craig Estes, R-Wichita Falls, offered an amendment that would have changed the name to the Texas Energy Commission.

"I think it's shorter and cleaner," he said.

But he withdrew his amendment, deferring to a different name idea from Sen. Glenn Hegar, R-Katy, who suggested the Texas Department of Oil and Gas.

After a series of closely contested votes, during which the chamber grew uncharacteristically quiet, Sen. Robert Nichols, R-Jacksonville, managed to win the day on behalf of his favored name.

The proposal still must gain the approval of the House.

The new name, Nichols wrote in a bill analysis, should reduce confusion among voters.


 

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