Join The Discussion

 

Ice cancels flights, snarls traffic; snow in North Texas forecast

DALLAS (AP) — More wintry weather was expected across parts of North Texas through Wednesday.

read more >

Einstein Bagels closing two Tarrant locations

Einstein Bagels is closing two Tarrant County locations, part of a series of 39 closings around the country, according to the company’s owners, JAB Holding Co.

read more >

Berkshire Hathaway company acquires Fort Worth firm

M&M Manufacturing, a producer of sheet metal products for the air distribution and ventilation market based in Fort Worth, has been acquired by MiTek Industries Inc., a subsidiary of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc.,

read more >

Plans for Grand Prairie indoor ski resort, Hard Rock Hotel evaporate

Plans for a $215 million indoor ski resort and Hard Rock Hotel in Grand Prairie have been shelved. Sherman Thurston, a member of the development team, sent a

read more >

Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

read more >

 

Abbott unveils TV ad in Spanish

PAUL J. WEBER, Associated Press


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — TITLE: "Contamos"

LENGTH: 30 seconds

AIRING: Univision and Spanish-language stations during the World Cup.

KEY IMAGE: Spoken entirely in Spanish, the ad opens with Greg Abbott's sister-in-law, Rosie Phalen, sitting in a kitchen and talking about first meeting the Republican nominee for governor more than 30 years ago. Abbott, who often mixes Spanish into campaign speeches but isn't fluent, is filmed chatting and laughing at a picnic with the family of his wife, who's the granddaughter of Mexican immigrants. "His values are our values. Faith, family and honesty," Phalen says in Spanish.

The ad ends with Abbott surrounded by his teenage daughter, Audrey, and others. Two are holding soccer balls as Abbott's logo appears onscreen with the words "para gobernador" (for governor).

ANALYSIS: Abbott's first television ad since winning the GOP nomination in March is a rebuttal to what critics and Democrats contend is the biggest problem facing Texas Republicans — Hispanic voters. The Texas Republican Party ratified a harder line on immigration in its party platform earlier this month, and the GOP is carrying a predominantly white slate of statewide candidates into November.

Abbott has said he wants to break the record for Hispanic support by a Texas Republican gubernatorial candidate. He and most in Texas politics considered the mark to have been set by George W. Bush in 1998, when some polls put him capturing as much as 49 percent of the Hispanic vote. Abbott hasn't used the same harsh rhetoric on immigration as others in his party, but has been criticized for using the phrase "third world" in describing corruption on the border. As attorney general, he's also defended redistricting maps that Hispanic civil rights groups say were drawn to weaken the strength of minority voters.

Abbott here is introducing Spanish-speaking viewers to his diverse family, which he often mentions while campaigning. If he wins in November, his wife, Cecilia, would be the first Hispanic first lady of Texas.

___

< back

Email   email
hide
Catch
How 'bout them Cowboys?