Join The Discussion

 

T&P Warehouse: Historic building remains in limbo as area redevelops

For years, the historic T&P Warehouse on West Lancaster Avenue downtown, built in 1931 to house freight for the Texas Pacific Railway, has sat vacant and deteriorating.

read more >

Susan Halsey, Fort Worth attorney, business leader, dies

Susan Halsey, a Fort Worth attorney who was also a community and business leader, died on Friday, Dec. 19. Halsey, 55, was chairman for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce in 2013-2014, leading the chamber during a year

read more >

Heating up: West Lancaster corridor projects moving forward

West Lancaster Avenue through downtown Fort Worth is heating up, with planners envisioning a lively mixed-use corridor that extends the central business district further south.

read more >

Meridian Bank Texas parent acquired by UMB Financial for $182.5M

Kansas City, Mo.-based UMB Financial Corp., the parent company of UMB Bank, said Dec. 15 it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Marquette Financial Companies in an all-stock transaction.

read more >

Cousins Properties to sell 777 Main tower in downtown Fort Worth

Cousins Properties Inc. has confirmed plans to sell the 777 Main office tower in downtown Fort Worth, according to a news release from the Atlanta-based real estate investment firm.

read more >

Texas official has beef with Chipotle after Aussie meat buy

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas agriculture commissioner on Monday aired a beef with Chipotle Mexican Grill and wants to talk with its founder after the company decided to import grass-fed beef from Australia.

Commissioner Todd Staples in a letter dated Monday says it is "misguided" and "irresponsible" for Chipotle founder Steve Ells to believe that Australian meat is raised more responsibly than cattle in Texas, the nation's leading producer, or other states.

Staples wrote he was "shocked" that Chipotle is getting beef from 8,000 miles away when there are producers galore in Texas.

"We have a wide variety of producers and processors," he wrote. "It seems foolish to discount these immense, local resources when making decisions about where to source your beef."

Ells last month defended the move by writing for the Huffington Post that Chipotle was having difficulty getting beef it prefers from U.S. producers because the lingering drought is leading to the smallest herd in decades.

The U.S. Agriculture Department said in January that the U.S. cattle herd was 89.3 million head, the lowest since 1952.

Chipotle spokesman Chris Arnold said the low US herd numbers mean there are fewer animals that meet the company protocol of using no hormones or antibiotics.

"It would be our preference to get that domestically but it's just not available," he said.

Staples says he wants Ells to meet with him and Texas beef industry leaders.

 

< back

Email   email
hide
TCU/Baylor
Did the College Football Playoff Committee get it right?