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Great Woman of Texas; Stacie McDavid

“I’ve always been a maverick in a number of ways,” says businesswoman and philanthropist Stacie McDavid.

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Thousands rally across US after Ferguson decision

Thousands of people rallied late Monday in U.S. cities including Los Angeles and New York to passionately but peacefully protest a grand jury's decision not to indict a white police officer who killed a black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo.

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Fort Worth Thanksgiving schedule announced

Thanksgiving closures have been announced, with most Fort Worth city offices – including City Hall – set to close Thursday Nov.27 and Friday Nov. 28 for the holiday, according to a city news release.

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Hope Lancarte of Joe T. Garcia's dies

Hope Lancarte, who ran her father's restaurant, Joe T. Garcia’s, for decades, died Thursday morning.. She was 86.

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Earthquake hits on Saturday near Irving

A 3.3 magnitude earthquake shook the Dallas-Fort Worth area around 9:15 p.m. Saturday night, according to the United State Geological survey.

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Weakness in mobile business hurts RadioShack 1Q

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — RadioShack's first-quarter loss widened and revenue slumped as the Fort Worth-based retailer dealt with weakness in its mobile business and consumer electronics.

Its performance missed Wall Street's view. The stock dropped more than 18 percent in premarket trading on Tuesday.

CEO Joseph C. Magnacca said in a statement that its mobile business was hurt because the current handset assortment didn't resonate well with customers. It was also contending with more promotions, including those of wireless carriers.

Magnacca said that RadioShack is working on building its pipeline of new products, including private brand and exclusive items such as those from new partnerships with Quirky and PCH.

The company is trying to update its image and compete with the rise of online and discount retailers. Long known as a destination for batteries and obscure electronic parts, RadioShack has sought to remake itself as a specialist in wireless devices and accessories. But growth in the wireless business is slowing, as more people have smartphones and see fewer reasons to upgrade.

Part of its turnaround efforts have included cutting costs, renovating stores and shuffling management. It also announced in March that it planned to close up to 1,100 of its stores in the U.S., leaving it with more than 4,000 U.S. locations.

For the period ended May 3, RadioShack Corp. lost $98.3 million, or 97 cents per share. That compares with a loss of $28 million, or 28 cents per share, a year earlier.

Excluding certain items, its loss from continuing operations was 98 cents per share. Analysts, on average, expected a loss of 52 cents per share, according to a FactSet poll.

Revenue for the company declined 13 percent to $736.7 million from $848.4 million. Wall Street was calling for $767.5 million.

Sales at stores open at least a year, a key gauge of a retailer's health, fell 14 percent on softer traffic and weakness in the mobile business. This metric excludes results from stores recently opened or closed.

Shares of RadioShack fell 18 cents to $1.36 in afternoon trading. Its shares have dropped almost 61 percent over the past year.

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?