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Trademark closes on 63-acre Waterside site in Fort Worth

Construction begins Oct. 20 on the development, to be anchored by a Whole Foods Market.

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UPDATE: $215M hotel, indoor ski project planned for Grand Prairie

Officials in Grand Prairie are expected later today to announce a $215 million project that will include a Hard Rock Hotel and an indoor ski facility.

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Two Fort Worth council members propose temporary single-family moratorium around TCU

The moratorium would apply to new permits for single-family homes around TCU, and give the city time to figure out what to do with a controversial proposed overlay in several neighborhoods around the university.

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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It's National Donut Day!

The Holy Donut in Portland, Maine, serves up potato donuts in a fix of flavors ranging from Sweet Potato Ginger to Maine Apple w/ Cider Glaze. Owner Leigh Kellis came up with the idea to start her own donut business a year and a half ago.
Credit: Lori Chapman/CNN

Emily Smith, CNN

CNN

There's a hole lotta happy going on. The first Friday in June is National Donut Day!

Started by the Salvation Army in Chicago in 1938, the day honors the Army’s ‘Donut Lassies’ who served treats and provided assistance to soldiers on the front lines during World War 1. (And this isn't to be confused with National Doughnut Day, which is in November and celebrates the actual food.)

Doughnuts have been around since long before the First World War, and we have the Dutch to thank for them. The Dutch would make "olykoek," which translates to oily cake. The first Dutch doughnuts didn’t have a hole, but they were fried in hot oil and the dough was sweet.

It wasn’t until 1847 that then 16-year-old Hanson Gregory claims he created the holed-out doughnut we know and love today. Sick of doughnuts with a raw center, he used a pepper pot to punch out holes to help his doughnuts cook more evenly. By 1920, Adolph Levitt, a Russian living in New York, had invented a doughnut machine. Thirteen years later, doughnuts were proclaimed the “Hit Food of the Century of Progress” by the World’s Fair in Chicago.

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