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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

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Mosquito-surveillance partnership between Fort Worth, UNTHSC renewed

The city of Fort Worth and the University of North Texas Health Science Center have renewed their mosquito-surveillance partnership, part of an effort blending hard science with community outreach to prevent the spread of West Nile virus.
Under the agreement, graduate students and a scientist from UNTHSC trap and collect mosquitos from more than 60 sites across the city. The mosquitos are then tested for WNV infection at labs at UNTHSC and Tarrant County Public Health.


Based on test results, medical entomologist and assistant professor of environmental and occupational health Joon-Hak Lee, makes weekly recommendations to city officials about whether any intervention methods or precautionary measures should be considered.
“The weekly snapshot of West Nile virus activity gives us a real-time look at the situation and the opportunity to stop any potential problems,” said Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price. “We have a program in place that allows us to be proactive and ensures that we get the most accurate and timely information to our residents as quickly as possible.”
The city plans to continue its public outreach by communicating with community leaders, neighborhood associations and door-to-door canvassing.
Lee said the prevention and control program can be used as a model for other cities in Texas.
At the height of the virus in 2012, the city had 16 positive mosquito pools and 81 human infections. Last year, there were five positive pools and six human infections.
-Betty Dillard
bdillard@bizpress.net
 

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