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TCU rises 20 places on influential U.S. News & World Report ranking

St. John's College in Annapolis, Md., has long disdained the rankings game. The liberal arts school, which focuses on the great works of Western civilization, was known for not responding to requests from U.S. News & World Report for information that the magazine uses to sort the nation's colleges.

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Fort Worth-based Woodmont plans $80M Hard Rock Hotel retail center

Woodmont Outlets of Fort Worth, an affiliate of The Woodmont Co., has partnered with Cherokee Nation Businesses for a proposed upscale retail development at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

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Barnett still packs economic punch, study finds

Despite reduced drilling and unstable gas prices, Fort Worth continues reaping the rewards of the Barnett Shale, according to a newly released study by The Perryman Group.7

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Time to make more Do-Nuts in DFW

Shipley Do-Nuts has signed a development agreement with Adkins Development Corp. to accelerate expansion in the Dallas-Fort Worth market.

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Leo's Foods to shutter Fort Worth plant, lay off 84

In a filing with the Texas Workforce Commission, Leo’s Foods will begin terminating employees over a 14 day period beginning Oct. 10.

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Telemedicine grant from Texas group to help brain aneurysm patients

For more information: 

themissyproject.org/

LEBANON, N.H. (AP) — A foundation created in memory of a 12-year-old Texas girl is helping a New Hampshire hospital provide rapid access to neurovascular specialists for brain aneurysm patients across northern New England.

The foundation, the Missy Project, in Austin, was created in 1999 to honor Marisa "Missy" Magel, who died while at summer camp from a brain aneurysm disease her family didn't know she had. The project recently donated $150,000 to the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Center for Telehealth, which will use telemedicine to give children and adults real-time access to neurovascular specialty care.

Telemedicine is a great fit for many neurovascular patients because a physical examination isn't always required, said Dr. Robert Singer, a neurosurgeon.

Typically, patients have to wait weeks to get an appointment with him after getting a scan from their doctor, he said. Telemedicine reduces patient travel and the wait time for an appointment, and gives the patients a better visit, he said.

"Many of them drive great distances for what is typically a 15-minute appointment, and then they have to return at a later time if they need a diagnostic or treatment procedure," he said. "That 15-minute appointment can easily be conducted via the virtual aneurysm clinic."

About 30,000 people in the United States have ruptured brain aneurysms each year, according to the National Institutes of Health.
 

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Arena
What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?