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Bridge collapse on I-35 north of Austin

SALADO, Texas (AP) — Emergency crews are responding to a reported bridge collapse along an interstate in Central Texas.

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Amazon begins Prime Now program in Dallas area

If you just have to have it now, as in one hour, you can, at least in the Dallas area, as Amazon.com Inc. announced Thursday it will offer Prime Now.

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Monty Bennett: Businessman, water district activist

Monty Bennett’s name will not appear on the ballot for the Tarrant Regional Water District board of directors yet he remains a powerful backstage player whose influence could shape the direction of the district’s business for years to come.

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Westchester Plaza manager says "business as usual" for now

The future of a redevelopment plan for the 50-year-old Westchester Plaza on Fort Worth's Near Southside is unclear.

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Price appeal: Condos going up on Near Southside

Chris Brassard and Omar Diaz had apartments in mind when they built a 12-unit complex on May Street just south of West Magnolia Avenue on Fort Worth’s Near Southside. Then their leasing agent, Will Northern of Northern Realty Group, suggested they consider selling the units as condominiums.

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Telemedicine grant from Texas group to help brain aneurysm patients

For more information: 

themissyproject.org/

LEBANON, N.H. (AP) — A foundation created in memory of a 12-year-old Texas girl is helping a New Hampshire hospital provide rapid access to neurovascular specialists for brain aneurysm patients across northern New England.

The foundation, the Missy Project, in Austin, was created in 1999 to honor Marisa "Missy" Magel, who died while at summer camp from a brain aneurysm disease her family didn't know she had. The project recently donated $150,000 to the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Center for Telehealth, which will use telemedicine to give children and adults real-time access to neurovascular specialty care.

Telemedicine is a great fit for many neurovascular patients because a physical examination isn't always required, said Dr. Robert Singer, a neurosurgeon.

Typically, patients have to wait weeks to get an appointment with him after getting a scan from their doctor, he said. Telemedicine reduces patient travel and the wait time for an appointment, and gives the patients a better visit, he said.

"Many of them drive great distances for what is typically a 15-minute appointment, and then they have to return at a later time if they need a diagnostic or treatment procedure," he said. "That 15-minute appointment can easily be conducted via the virtual aneurysm clinic."

About 30,000 people in the United States have ruptured brain aneurysms each year, according to the National Institutes of Health.
 

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