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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Telemedicine grant from Texas group to help brain aneurysm patients

For more information: 

themissyproject.org/

LEBANON, N.H. (AP) — A foundation created in memory of a 12-year-old Texas girl is helping a New Hampshire hospital provide rapid access to neurovascular specialists for brain aneurysm patients across northern New England.

The foundation, the Missy Project, in Austin, was created in 1999 to honor Marisa "Missy" Magel, who died while at summer camp from a brain aneurysm disease her family didn't know she had. The project recently donated $150,000 to the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Center for Telehealth, which will use telemedicine to give children and adults real-time access to neurovascular specialty care.

Telemedicine is a great fit for many neurovascular patients because a physical examination isn't always required, said Dr. Robert Singer, a neurosurgeon.

Typically, patients have to wait weeks to get an appointment with him after getting a scan from their doctor, he said. Telemedicine reduces patient travel and the wait time for an appointment, and gives the patients a better visit, he said.

"Many of them drive great distances for what is typically a 15-minute appointment, and then they have to return at a later time if they need a diagnostic or treatment procedure," he said. "That 15-minute appointment can easily be conducted via the virtual aneurysm clinic."

About 30,000 people in the United States have ruptured brain aneurysms each year, according to the National Institutes of Health.
 

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