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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Fort Worth's TPG takes controlling interest in Hollywood, sports powerhouse

A Fort Worth firm has gone Hollywood.

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Downtown Fort Worth TIF reaches parking agreement with four garages

The TIF board will meet Oct. 29 to consider the agreements.

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Oil price drop goes unnoticed in Texas' Eagle Ford shale

CUERO, Texas — From her vantage point of the U.S. shale oil boom, Jill Potts doesn't see anything to worry about.

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Renovated Daniel-Meyer to put TCU basketball in the spotlight

You might say the Texas Christian University men’s basketball team was the sacrificial lamb in the university’s football-motivated move from the Mountain West Conference to the Big 12 Conference. The rising

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Zebra mussel rules expand statewide

Zebra mussels

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved a new regulation that requires all boats operating on public fresh water anywhere in Texas be drained before leaving or approaching a lake or river to help combat the further spread of zebra mussels and other invasive species.
The new measure will take effect July 1.


Currently in effect in 47 North and Central Texas counties, the new rule requires persons leaving or approaching public water to drain all water from their vessels and on-board receptacles. This applies to all types and sizes of boats whether powered or not, personal watercraft, sailboats, kayaks/canoes, or any other vessel used on public waters.
TPWD urges all boaters to begin the preventative practice immediately since microscopic larvae (called veligers) hiding in a boat can travel to another water body and cause a new zebra mussel infestation.


The rapidly reproducing mussels, originally from Eurasia, can clog public-water intake pipes, harm boats and motors left in infested waters by covering boat hulls, block water-cooling systems, completely cover anything left under water, and make water recreation hazardous because of their sharp edges. Zebra mussels also compete with baitfish such as shad for available forage and threaten native mussel populations.
Zebra mussels became established in Texas in Lake Texoma in 2009. In 2012, they were found in Lake Ray Roberts and the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. Last year, zebra mussels spread to Lakes Bridgeport, Lavon, Lewisville and Belton.
More information, including where water draining regulations are currently in effect, is online at www.texasinvasives.org/zebramussels.

-Betty Dillard
bdillard@bizpress.net
 

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