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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Top area CFOs honored

The Fort Worth Business Press honored 13 area chief financial officers today with a luncheon at the Fort Worth Club.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Zebra mussel rules expand statewide

Zebra mussels

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved a new regulation that requires all boats operating on public fresh water anywhere in Texas be drained before leaving or approaching a lake or river to help combat the further spread of zebra mussels and other invasive species.
The new measure will take effect July 1.


Currently in effect in 47 North and Central Texas counties, the new rule requires persons leaving or approaching public water to drain all water from their vessels and on-board receptacles. This applies to all types and sizes of boats whether powered or not, personal watercraft, sailboats, kayaks/canoes, or any other vessel used on public waters.
TPWD urges all boaters to begin the preventative practice immediately since microscopic larvae (called veligers) hiding in a boat can travel to another water body and cause a new zebra mussel infestation.


The rapidly reproducing mussels, originally from Eurasia, can clog public-water intake pipes, harm boats and motors left in infested waters by covering boat hulls, block water-cooling systems, completely cover anything left under water, and make water recreation hazardous because of their sharp edges. Zebra mussels also compete with baitfish such as shad for available forage and threaten native mussel populations.
Zebra mussels became established in Texas in Lake Texoma in 2009. In 2012, they were found in Lake Ray Roberts and the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. Last year, zebra mussels spread to Lakes Bridgeport, Lavon, Lewisville and Belton.
More information, including where water draining regulations are currently in effect, is online at www.texasinvasives.org/zebramussels.

-Betty Dillard
bdillard@bizpress.net
 

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