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Trademark closes on 63-acre Waterside site in Fort Worth

Construction begins Oct. 20 on the development, to be anchored by a Whole Foods Market.

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UPDATE: $215M hotel, indoor ski project planned for Grand Prairie

Officials in Grand Prairie are expected later today to announce a $215 million project that will include a Hard Rock Hotel and an indoor ski facility.

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Two Fort Worth council members propose temporary single-family moratorium around TCU

The moratorium would apply to new permits for single-family homes around TCU, and give the city time to figure out what to do with a controversial proposed overlay in several neighborhoods around the university.

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Zebra mussel rules expand statewide

Zebra mussels

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved a new regulation that requires all boats operating on public fresh water anywhere in Texas be drained before leaving or approaching a lake or river to help combat the further spread of zebra mussels and other invasive species.
The new measure will take effect July 1.


Currently in effect in 47 North and Central Texas counties, the new rule requires persons leaving or approaching public water to drain all water from their vessels and on-board receptacles. This applies to all types and sizes of boats whether powered or not, personal watercraft, sailboats, kayaks/canoes, or any other vessel used on public waters.
TPWD urges all boaters to begin the preventative practice immediately since microscopic larvae (called veligers) hiding in a boat can travel to another water body and cause a new zebra mussel infestation.


The rapidly reproducing mussels, originally from Eurasia, can clog public-water intake pipes, harm boats and motors left in infested waters by covering boat hulls, block water-cooling systems, completely cover anything left under water, and make water recreation hazardous because of their sharp edges. Zebra mussels also compete with baitfish such as shad for available forage and threaten native mussel populations.
Zebra mussels became established in Texas in Lake Texoma in 2009. In 2012, they were found in Lake Ray Roberts and the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. Last year, zebra mussels spread to Lakes Bridgeport, Lavon, Lewisville and Belton.
More information, including where water draining regulations are currently in effect, is online at www.texasinvasives.org/zebramussels.

-Betty Dillard
bdillard@bizpress.net
 

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