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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Great Women of Texas honored

The Fort Worth Business Press held the Great Women of Texas event Wednesday night at the Omni Fort Worth Hotel. Stacie McDavid of McDavid Investments was honored as the

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Grocers, retailers flocking to Southlake

With its economic development engine revving at full throttle, Southlake is about to welcome several major retail and commercial projects that underscore its image

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Denton could be first city in state to ban fracking

EMILY SCHMALL, Associated Press


DENTON, Texas (AP) — A North Texas city that sits on top of the Barnett Shale, believed to hold one of the largest natural gas reserves in the U.S., could become the first place in Texas to permanently ban hydraulic fracturing.

A temporary ban is in place until September, but fracking opponents want to make that permanent through an ordinance that would prohibit the practice in Denton.

Operators would be allowed to continue extracting energy from the 275 wells in Denton that have already undergone fracking, but not initiate the process on old wells.

The city council will have 60 days to hold a public hearing and to vote on a measure expected to be submitted Wednesday.

"There's industrial activity right in the midst of a residential area diminishing people's property values and exposing them to toxins," said Adam Briggle of the Denton Drilling Awareness Group, the non-profit that organized the petition.

The fracking process involves blasting a mix of water, sand and chemicals into deep rock formations to free oil and gas.

The process has led to major economic benefits but also to fears that the chemicals could spread to water supplies and worsen air quality.

Under Texas law, land ownership is split between the surface and the minerals below, and in Denton, most of the mineral rights are held by estates and trusts outside Texas. Fracking in the city has created a divide between owners of mineral rights and residents who have to live with the consequences.

At the intersection of Vintage Ave. and S. Bonnie Brae in Denton, newly built homes face gas wells located about 200 feet away.

Industry proponents argue that fracking can be done safely and is cleaner than other forms of energy extraction. Of the 19 oil and gas companies operating in Denton, EagleRidge Energy is among the biggest.

"There is no question that wells can be drilled and fracked safely," said EagleRidge Chief Operating Office Mark Grawe. EagleRidge would consider a ban on fracking a violation of property rights and would likely lead to a claim against the city, Grawe said.
 

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?