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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

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GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

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BASF eyes new propylene plant along Gulf Coast

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — German chemical titan BASF SE is evaluating plans to spend more than $1.4 billion to build a propylene plant somewhere along the Gulf Coast.

Kurt Bock, chairman of the company's board of executive directors, said Friday that a feedstock of cheap natural gas would give BASF a price advantage, and would allow it to stop buying so much of the building block for plastics and chemicals from others.

"We want to further process this basic product in North America and significantly expand our business," Bock said in a speech to shareholders at the company's annual meeting in Mannheim, Germany. "Propylene is needed, for example, for coatings, detergents, or superabsorbents for diapers."

Bock said the plant would convert natural gas to methanol and then to propylene, which he described as a new technology.

The world's largest chemical company said the plant would be its single largest investment ever. It didn't give details about where it would build, but chemical makers have flooded into south Louisiana and the Texas coast to take advantage of cheap natural gas being extracted from shale formations through hydraulic fracturing. Tens of billions of dollars' worth of projects have been announced in Louisiana, although not all will be built.

"With shale gas and shale oil, we also have access to cheap energy and raw materials for our production," Bock said.

In October, BASF made a similar announcement that it and the Norwegian company Yara were jointly exploring a "world scale" ammonia plant along the Gulf Coast. Like with the propylene announcement, BASF said it would like to make its own ammonia for use in chemicals rather than buy it from others.

BASF already has more than 2,000 employees in Louisiana, with a major site at Geismar. It also has plants with more than 100 employees in the Texas cities of Beaumont, Freeport, Pasadena and Port Arthur, as well as one in McIntosh, Alabama.

 

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