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Trinity Terrace set to launch 23-story third tower

Trinity Terrace
River Tower

• Groundbreaking set for November
• 79 apartments
• 14th floor fine-dining restaurant
• Penthouse apartment
• Hospital, assisted-living extensions
• Alzheimer’s wing

 

Scott Nishimura
snishimura@bizpress.net

Trinity Terrace, the Fort Worth retirement community near the Trinity River downtown, is moving closer to launching construction of its 23-story third tower that will include a penthouse apartment and fine dining.
November groundbreaking “is the goal,” Rene Beauchamp, Trinity Terrace’s residential services director, said.
The 79 planned apartments are 30 percent leased, and “we’re aiming towards 50 (percent) before we break ground,” she said.
The new River Tower, to be built north of the Trinity Terrace’s original Terrace Tower, will include 79 apartments, extensions of the Terrace Tower’s hospital and assisted living floors, Alzheimer’s wing, and 14th floor restaurant featuring an a la carte menu.


The current hospital floor has 46 beds. The expanded floor will feature 80 beds and all-private rooms, Beauchamp said.
Trinity Terrace is currently converting all of its current hospital floor beds to all-private rooms from semi-private, Beauchamp said.
Trinity Terrace recently secured City Council approval to sell alcoholic beverages in its food service, a precursor to launching what Beauchamp says will be “four-star” dining in the new restaurant.
Trinity Terrace has one main dining room that is served largely by a buffet, and a game room that it’s converting to a bistro. It also offers a private dining room on its assisted living floor, and food service to the hospital wing.
Trinity Terrace’s Terrace and City towers have 280 apartments and 330-340 residents, Beauchamp said.
The nonprofit Trinity Terrace Foundation owns the community. It built the Terrace Tower 31 years ago, and the second City Tower in 2009.


Apartments range from 560 square feet to the 1,998-square-foot penthouses, and include full kitchens, granite countertops and balconies. Building amenities include banking, guest apartments, game room, chapel, computer lab and business center, convenience store, and various volunteer and social opportunities.
Entrance fees and monthly charges vary by apartment size, lease flexibility and the number of people living in the unit.
On a 560-square-foot one-bedroom apartment for one person, for example, the “traditional” entrance fee, which allows for a prorated refund within the first 36 months, is $83,600. The monthly service fee starts at $2,261.
 

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