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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Britain to honor Churchill on 5-pound note

Mark Thompson


LONDON (CNNMoney) -- Is Britain's fiver about to become a 'Winston'?

Beginning in 2016, the U.K.'s smallest banknote -- the £5 note -- will feature a portrait of wartime leader Winston Churchill, commemorating his achievements as a politician, writer and orator.

"It seems entirely appropriate to put Sir Winston on what is probably our most popular note," Bank of England Governor Mervyn King said Friday. "Perhaps the note itself will become known as a Winston."

A former journalist and soldier, Churchill became prime minister in 1940 at the head of a national government, shortly after the outbreak of World War II when defeat by Nazi Germany seemed likely.

His stirring speeches were a source of national inspiration during the dark years that followed, and the new banknote will celebrate one of his most famous lines, made in a speech to parliament on the day he became prime minister: "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat."

Churchill was defeated in an election in 1945 but returned as prime minister in 1951. In recognition of his leadership, he was granted U.S. citizenship in 1963, two years before he died, and became the first Briton to have a U.S. warship named after him.

The Bank of England, which produces over one billion banknotes a year, began promoting eminent Britons from the past on the reverse side of its notes in 1970. The front is reserved for an image of the monarch.

Churchill will follow 19th century prison reformer Elizabeth Fry on the £5 note. Naturalist Charles Darwin is currently featured on the £10 note and economist Adam Smith's image is on the £20 notes.

 

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