Join The Discussion

 

RadioShack sees stock jump on investment report

Fort Worth-based RadioShack saw its stock increase as much as 45 percent on Friday as investor Standard General LP said it was continuing talks on new financing for the electronics retailer.

read more >

Fort Worth couple gets in 'Shark Tank,' comes out with deal

A Fort Worth couple who started a business when they couldn’t sleep, were the first entrepreneurs to get a deal on ABC’s Shark Tank in the season premiere on Sept. 26.

read more >

20 from Dallas-Fort Worth on Forbes wealthiest list

There are 20 Dallas-Fort Worth residents listed among the 400 richest Americans, according to the Forbes 400 list of The Richest People in America 2014.

read more >

Internal audit says EPA mismanaged Fort Worth project

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — An internal audit by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reveals the agency mismanaged an experiment using new ways to demolish asbestos-ridden buildings.

read more >

Texas Wesleyan acquires two strip shopping centers on East Rosedale

Texas Wesleyan University has purchased two strip shopping centers on East Rosedale Street across from its Southeast Fort Worth campus, the university’s president said Friday.

read more >

Taco Bell tests new restaurant aimed at Chipotle crowd

U.S. Taco Co. aims to fit in with other "fast-casual" chains like Chipotle, Qdoba Mexican Grill and Panera. It is set to open in Huntington Beach, California summer 2014.
Credit: Courtesy Taco Bell

Katie Lobosco

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- You can't get a Mexican Car Bomb at your local Taco Bell. But you will at a new restaurant the fast-food chain is testing in a bid to reach new customers.

How far is Taco Bell branching out? The Mexican Car Bomb isn't even a taco. It's a vanilla shake with Guinness, tequila caramel sauce and chocolate flakes.

U.S. Taco Co, set to open in Huntington Beach, Calif., this summer, with a taco-focused menu -- but not the same tacos you can buy for a buck or two at Taco Bell.

The "Brotherly Love" will be like eating a Philly cheese steak stuffed inside a flour tortilla. The "Winner Winner" adds a southern twist, with crispy chicken and gravy.

The southern California location is a test-run, but it could be the first of dozens across the country, Taco Bell CEO Greg Creed told the Orange County Register.

The eatery won't offer Mexican restaurant favorites like burritos or tortilla chips, and instead it will sell steak fries with tacos.

U.S. Taco Co. aims to fit in with other "fast-casual" chains like Chipotle, Qdoba Mexican Grill and Panera, said Morningstar analyst R.J. Hottovy.

Those chains offer higher quality food at the same speed as a fast-food joint.

It's a growing industry so it makes sense that Taco Bell, owned by Yum! Brands, would want to enter the field.

"The cost to operate isn't as high as casual restaurants, but they can still charge higher prices. It's very lucrative," Hottovy said.

The tacos will cost $4 at the new restaurant, while most cost under $2 at the nearly 6,000 Taco Bell locations in the United States.

< back

Email   email
hide
Arena
What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?