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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

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A consumer's guide to streaming devices

Doug Gross

CNN

(CNN) -- When Amazon released its Fire TV system this month, it propelled the company into the increasingly competitive marketplace of devices that stream Web content into the living room.

The set-top box now competes with Apple, Google and Samsung, as well as early innovator Roku and even the gaming world's top consoles for the eyeballs of people who stream services like Netflix, Hulu and YouTube onto their televisions.

These devices are relatively new innovations: Roku first announced a simple Netflix-streaming box in 2008. But in recent years, more and more people have begun using devices that harness the Internet's bountiful offerings and send them, usually via Wi-Fi, to a TV set.

According to Experian, almost half of all U.S. adults and 67% of young adults now watch streamed or downloaded video at least once a week.

And 7.6 million households in the United States have "cut the cord," using Web streaming and downloading exclusively instead of cable, satellite or broadcast, for their television viewing, the company said in a report this week.

But it's still a new concept for a lot of folks. And with so many players in the game, not to mention a new wave of "smart TVs" that hook up to the Web on their own, it can be hard to pick a favorite.

If you own a smart TV, you may not need a separate device for streaming. But the software on many smart TVs is still clunky, and most Web-streaming gadgets offer a larger menu of apps and channels.

Here, we break down the top players in the Web television market and compare details about their products.

Amazon Fire TV

Price: $100

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: Amazon (obviously), Spotify, YouTube, Hulu, Netflix, Watch ESPN, Showtime

Works with: Android or iOS devices

Storage: 8 GB

Notes: No HBO Go, but a new deal offers limited HBO programming (Sorry, no "Game of Thrones"). Features voice search for shows, movies, actors or genres. Doubles as a casual gaming device with titles like "Minecraft."

Apple TV

Price: $100

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: Hulu, YouTube, Netflix, HBO Go

Works with: Apple mobile devices

Storage: None on device

Notes: No Amazon. Streams music and video from iTunes, as well as content from iPhones and iPads. Ideal for someone who owns several Apple devices.

Google Chromecast

Price: $35

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: YouTube, Hulu, Netflix, HBO Go, Pandora, MLB.tv

Works with: Android, iOS

Storage: None on device

Notes: No Amazon. Easy setup; this little dongle basically works like a thumb drive.

PlayStation 4

Price: $400

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: Hulu, Netflix, Amazon

Works with: Android, iOS, PlayStation Vita

Storage: 500 GB

Notes: Also features a Blu-Ray player. More expensive but obviously a more diverse device.

Roku 3

Price: $100

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: Spotify, Hulu, YouTube, Netflix, HBO Go, Amazon, Showtime

Works with: Android, iOS

Storage: None on device, but you can expand it with a memory card

Notes: Wide app selection. With more than 1,000 channels, offers perhaps the widest variety of content. Not compatible with 4K televisions.

Roku Streaming Stick

Price: $50

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: Same as Roku 3

Works with: Android, iOS

Storage: None on device

Notes: An answer to Chromecast, this little stick offers more content than the Google product. Some reviewers have said it's slow loading some popular apps (but they work fine once loaded).

Samsung Smart Media Player

Price: $150

Resolution: 1080p

Key apps: Netflix, YouTube, Amazon

Works with: Android, iOS

Storage: None on device, but you can expand it with a memory card

Notes: Replaces the user's cable box. Includes browser for Web surfing. Pricier than other dedicated media players.

Xbox One

Price: $500

Resolution: 1080p

Key Apps: YouTube, Hulu, Netflix, Skype, ESPN, NFL

Works with: Android, iOS, Xbox Smartglass

Storage: 500 GB

Notes: Includes Blu-ray player. Allows users to watch live television. Also more expensive but more diverse.

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