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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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On the rise: Kolache bakery stirs up Fort Worth breakfast scene

Investment bankers Wade Chappell and Greg Saltsman didn’t know anything about baking or how to make kolaches when they started their own kolache delivery business in Fort Worth. The two friends just loved eating the Czech pastries but couldn’t find a product they liked locally.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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Fort Worth denies three building permits amid TCU overlay debate

City Council members will consider appeals on the three single-family permits Tuesday.

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Taking a RIDE: Fort Worth-based network saddles up for broadcast

As a media executive and owner of television studios, Michael Fletcher has been pitched some ideas before. Like the one from a local preacher who wanted to bust prostitutes and drug dealers – on air – and urge them to come to God.

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What stumps Warren Buffett? Minimum wage

Katie Lobosco

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Should the federal minimum wage be raised? It's a tough question, even for business magnate Warren Buffett.

"I thought about it for 50 years and I just don't know the answer on it," Buffett told CNN Wednesday. "In economics you always have to say 'and then what?' And the real question is are more people going to be better off if it is raised," he said.

Buffett also said that the current federal minimum of $7.25 is not a living wage. If raising it didn't hurt employment he'd want it up significantly higher. "You do lose some employment as you increase the minimum wage, if you didn't I would be for having it $15 an hour," he said.

Many states and cities have recently raised their minimum wage rate above the federal minimum and President Obama is pushing for Congress to raise the nationwide rate to $10.10 an hour.

Buffett said he's not arguing against raising the minimum wage, but suggests that increasing the earned income tax credit may be a better way to attack the problem.

The EITC is an antipoverty program designed to encourage people to work by providing a credit on wages.

"I know that if you raise the earned income tax credit significantly, that would definitely help people who've gotten the short stick in life," Buffett said.

Buffett conducted media interviews in New York after a lunch that brought in a $1 million donation for a charity called GLIDE. The charity runs a number of anti-poverty and educational programs in San Francisco, a city with one of the highest levels of inequality in the country.

The booming tech industry and high-paid executives in the Silicon Valley area have been blamed for rising rent prices pushing some people out of their homes.

Over the past 14 years, Buffett has raised nearly $16 million for GLIDE by auctioning off the opportunity to have lunch with the investing guru.

"I'm not rich because somebody is poor. But some people are poor because the system does not reward particular skills," Buffett said. "Some of them have very limited skills in terms of what it brings them in a market system," he said.

- CNN's Poppy Harlow contributed to this report.

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What was the message of the midterm elections?