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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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What stumps Warren Buffett? Minimum wage

Katie Lobosco

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Should the federal minimum wage be raised? It's a tough question, even for business magnate Warren Buffett.

"I thought about it for 50 years and I just don't know the answer on it," Buffett told CNN Wednesday. "In economics you always have to say 'and then what?' And the real question is are more people going to be better off if it is raised," he said.

Buffett also said that the current federal minimum of $7.25 is not a living wage. If raising it didn't hurt employment he'd want it up significantly higher. "You do lose some employment as you increase the minimum wage, if you didn't I would be for having it $15 an hour," he said.

Many states and cities have recently raised their minimum wage rate above the federal minimum and President Obama is pushing for Congress to raise the nationwide rate to $10.10 an hour.

Buffett said he's not arguing against raising the minimum wage, but suggests that increasing the earned income tax credit may be a better way to attack the problem.

The EITC is an antipoverty program designed to encourage people to work by providing a credit on wages.

"I know that if you raise the earned income tax credit significantly, that would definitely help people who've gotten the short stick in life," Buffett said.

Buffett conducted media interviews in New York after a lunch that brought in a $1 million donation for a charity called GLIDE. The charity runs a number of anti-poverty and educational programs in San Francisco, a city with one of the highest levels of inequality in the country.

The booming tech industry and high-paid executives in the Silicon Valley area have been blamed for rising rent prices pushing some people out of their homes.

Over the past 14 years, Buffett has raised nearly $16 million for GLIDE by auctioning off the opportunity to have lunch with the investing guru.

"I'm not rich because somebody is poor. But some people are poor because the system does not reward particular skills," Buffett said. "Some of them have very limited skills in terms of what it brings them in a market system," he said.

- CNN's Poppy Harlow contributed to this report.

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