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UPDATE: Wilkie, longtime head of Sid Richardson Foundation, dies at 91

Valleau Wilkie Jr., who headed the Sid W. Richardson Foundation from 1973 to 2011, died Tuesday in Sunapee, N.H., at 91.

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Oil plunge sparks concern of real estate slowdown in U.S. energy centers including Texas

SEATTLE — The drop in oil prices to five-year lows, while helping consumers, is sparking concern that leasing and construction demand will be hurt in some of North America's best-performing markets for commercial real estate.

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As oil prices plunge, Texas eyes are on new comptroller

In January of 1983, just one month after Billy Hamilton stepped into his position as Texas’ chief revenue estimator, the state was wading in a flood of red ink that no one had seen coming. Plummeting oil prices had pushed state tax collections $100 million below the previous

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Texan among those honored as Carnegie Heroes

Winners of Carnegie Hero medals announced Monday:

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Study: Texas children living with relatives often don't receive state support

About 253,000 Texas children live with family members who are not their parents and many of those are not receiving state and federal benefits, according to a report released last week.

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RadioShack's store operations executive resigns

NEW YORK (AP) — RadioShack, which recently announced that it plans to close up to 1,100 stores, says that Troy Risch, its executive vice president of store operations has resigned.

In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, RadioShack Corp. said that Risch resigned on Friday to pursue other interests. The retailer said Risch's duties will temporarily be handled by other managers, effective immediately.

Last month RadioShack said that it plans to close about a fifth of its U.S. locations. The closings would leave the company with more than 4,000 U.S. stores. That's still far more than Best Buy, which has roughly 1,400 U.S. locations, and makes RadioShack stores nearly as common as Wal-Mart locations.

RadioShack has been fighting to update its image and compete with online and discount retailers. Long known as a destination for batteries and obscure electronic parts, the company has sought to remake itself as a specialist in wireless devices and accessories. But growth in the wireless business is slowing, as more people have smartphones and see fewer reasons to upgrade.

Aside from slashing costs and shuffling management, RadioShack has been renovating its stores with a more modern look.

Shares of RadioShack gained 5 cents, or 3.5 percent, to $1.50 in premarket trading on Tuesday shortly before the market open.
 

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Did the College Football Playoff Committee get it right?