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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Is former Massey's building ready to fall?

Massey's Restaurant building in a recent photo. Photo by A. Lee Graham

Has the former Massey’s restaurant served its last chicken fried steak? That’s up to the Dallas real estate investor who bought the 1805 Eighth Ave. property in Fort Worth’s hospital district.
“I’m meeting with some folks there to help me decide,” said Don Williams, who purchased the property in December for about $650,000, according to Xceligent Inc., but planned to meet with developers the week of April 14 to help decide its fate.
The 4,000-square-foot building has remained shuttered since closing in 2011. After Charles “Herb” Massey Sr. opened the eatery in 1947, it gained acclaim for its chicken fried steaks and down-home charm. But it closed in 1996, a decision made by Charles Herbert Massey Jr. and his wife Diane Massey.


It reopened the next year after Todd A. Scott and John Hamilton leased the site, reopening it under the same name. But it closed for good on Feb. 6, 2011, a day that left a bittersweet taste in the mouths of regulars more accustomed to the golden-crust filets that popularized the restaurant in Dan Jenkins’ novel, Baja Oklahoma.
Only five months after snapping up the property – “I bought it as a trust for my son, Sebastian,” Williams said – the Dallas investor said he didn’t know whether a new restaurant or retailer will fill the space or if the building might be razed. Current zoning allows residential and commercial uses for the property. - A. Lee Graham

lgraham@bizpress.net

 

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?