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Ebby Halliday acquires Fort Worth’s Williams Trew

Williams Trew Real Estate of Fort Worth has been acquired by Dallas-based residential real estate brokerage Ebby Halliday Real Estate Inc.

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Meridian Bank Texas parent acquired by UMB Financial for $182.5M

Kansas City, Mo.-based UMB Financial Corp., the parent company of UMB Bank, said Dec. 15 it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Marquette Financial Companies in an all-stock transaction.

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T&P Warehouse: Historic building remains in limbo as area redevelops

For years, the historic T&P Warehouse on West Lancaster Avenue downtown, built in 1931 to house freight for the Texas Pacific Railway, has sat vacant and deteriorating.

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Cousins Properties to sell 777 Main tower in downtown Fort Worth

Cousins Properties Inc. has confirmed plans to sell the 777 Main office tower in downtown Fort Worth, according to a news release from the Atlanta-based real estate investment firm.

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Glen Garden sale closes, distillery on tap

Firestone & Robertson Distilling Co. closed late Wednesday on its purchase of the historic Glen Garden Country Club in southeast Fort Worth, with plans to convert it into a whiskey distillery and bucolic visitor attraction.

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Is former Massey's building ready to fall?

Massey's Restaurant building in a recent photo. Photo by A. Lee Graham

Has the former Massey’s restaurant served its last chicken fried steak? That’s up to the Dallas real estate investor who bought the 1805 Eighth Ave. property in Fort Worth’s hospital district.
“I’m meeting with some folks there to help me decide,” said Don Williams, who purchased the property in December for about $650,000, according to Xceligent Inc., but planned to meet with developers the week of April 14 to help decide its fate.
The 4,000-square-foot building has remained shuttered since closing in 2011. After Charles “Herb” Massey Sr. opened the eatery in 1947, it gained acclaim for its chicken fried steaks and down-home charm. But it closed in 1996, a decision made by Charles Herbert Massey Jr. and his wife Diane Massey.


It reopened the next year after Todd A. Scott and John Hamilton leased the site, reopening it under the same name. But it closed for good on Feb. 6, 2011, a day that left a bittersweet taste in the mouths of regulars more accustomed to the golden-crust filets that popularized the restaurant in Dan Jenkins’ novel, Baja Oklahoma.
Only five months after snapping up the property – “I bought it as a trust for my son, Sebastian,” Williams said – the Dallas investor said he didn’t know whether a new restaurant or retailer will fill the space or if the building might be razed. Current zoning allows residential and commercial uses for the property. - A. Lee Graham

lgraham@bizpress.net

 

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