Join The Discussion

 

Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

read more >

Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

read more >

Fort Worth launching Stockyards design task force

The task force, to be chaired by the Fort Worth architect Eric Hahnfeld, would be responsible for confirming the boundaries of the city's planned Stockyards design district and reviewing the work of a consultant.

read more >

GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

read more >

Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

read more >

Is former Massey's building ready to fall?

Massey's Restaurant building in a recent photo. Photo by A. Lee Graham

Has the former Massey’s restaurant served its last chicken fried steak? That’s up to the Dallas real estate investor who bought the 1805 Eighth Ave. property in Fort Worth’s hospital district.
“I’m meeting with some folks there to help me decide,” said Don Williams, who purchased the property in December for about $650,000, according to Xceligent Inc., but planned to meet with developers the week of April 14 to help decide its fate.
The 4,000-square-foot building has remained shuttered since closing in 2011. After Charles “Herb” Massey Sr. opened the eatery in 1947, it gained acclaim for its chicken fried steaks and down-home charm. But it closed in 1996, a decision made by Charles Herbert Massey Jr. and his wife Diane Massey.


It reopened the next year after Todd A. Scott and John Hamilton leased the site, reopening it under the same name. But it closed for good on Feb. 6, 2011, a day that left a bittersweet taste in the mouths of regulars more accustomed to the golden-crust filets that popularized the restaurant in Dan Jenkins’ novel, Baja Oklahoma.
Only five months after snapping up the property – “I bought it as a trust for my son, Sebastian,” Williams said – the Dallas investor said he didn’t know whether a new restaurant or retailer will fill the space or if the building might be razed. Current zoning allows residential and commercial uses for the property. - A. Lee Graham

lgraham@bizpress.net

 

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?