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Trademark closes on 63-acre Waterside site in Fort Worth

Construction begins Oct. 20 on the development, to be anchored by a Whole Foods Market.

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UPDATE: $215M hotel, indoor ski project planned for Grand Prairie

Officials in Grand Prairie are expected later today to announce a $215 million project that will include a Hard Rock Hotel and an indoor ski facility.

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Two Fort Worth council members propose temporary single-family moratorium around TCU

The moratorium would apply to new permits for single-family homes around TCU, and give the city time to figure out what to do with a controversial proposed overlay in several neighborhoods around the university.

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Once-conjoined twins to leave Texas hospital

DALLAS (AP) — The conditions of conjoined twins separated last summer have steadily improved, and officials say they'll be released this week from a Dallas hospital.

Officials at Medical City Children's Hospital announced Monday that Owen and Emmett Ezell are expected to be discharged Wednesday. They were born in July joined at the abdomen.

The boys are no longer being fed through an IV but continue to be fed through tubes in their abdomens. And instead of being hooked to breathing machines, they now need only the assistance of a trachea tube, officials said.

The boys will move from the hospital to a rehab center.

Owen and Emmett were separated at the hospital in August after being born joined from just below the breast bone to just below the belly button. The babies shared a liver and intestines and had an approximately 3-by-5-inch area on their lower stomach that wasn't covered by skin or muscles.

Dr. Clair Schwendeman, a neonatologist, said in August that once the boys were born, tests were done to determine exactly how many connections they had. During the nine-hour surgery, a team of surgeons separated the liver and intestines, with the most difficult part being the separation of a shared blood vessel in the liver.

Conjoined twins are rare, occurring in about one in 50,000 to one in 200,000 deliveries, the doctor said.

Dave and Jenni Ezell discovered the twins they were expecting were conjoined on March 1, when Jenni Ezell was 17 weeks pregnant. The couple, who now live in Dallas but lived in Oklahoma at the time, said their doctor there gave them little hope the babies would survive.

 

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