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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Hilton Fort Worth named to Historic Hotels

The Hilton Fort Worth is one of 24 hotels named a member of the Historic Hotels of America, the Washington, D.C.-based group announced on Nov. 18.

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Protecting your passwords after Heartbleed

The newly discovered Heartbleed bug in OpenSSL could have far-reaching consequences for online security.
Credit: From Heartbleed.com

Change these passwords right now
By Jose Pagliery

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Websites are racing to patch the Heartbleed bug, the worst security hole the Internet has ever seen.

As sites fix the bug on their end, it's time for you to change your passwords. The Heartbleed bug allowed information leaks from a key safety feature that is supposed to keep your online communication private -- email, banking, shopping, and passwords.

Don't change all your passwords yet, though. If a company hasn't yet updated its site, you still can't connect safely. A new password would be compromised too.

Many companies are not informing their customers of the danger -- or asking them to update their log-in credentials. So, here's a handy password list. It'll be updated as companies respond to CNN's questions.

Change these passwords now (they were patched)

Google, YouTube and Gmail Facebook Yahoo, Yahoo Mail, Tumblr, Flickr OKCupid Wikipedia

Don't worry about these (they don't use the affected software, or ran a different version)

Amazon AOL and Mapquest Bank of America Capital One bank Charles Schwab Chase bank Citibank E*Trade Fidelity HSBC bank LinkedIn Microsoft, Hotmail and Outlook PayPal PNC bank Scottrade TD Ameritrade Twitter U.S. Bank Vanguard Wells Fargo

Don't change these passwords yet (still unclear, no response)

American Express Apple, iCloud and iTunes Healthcare.gov

Lily Hay Newman
(c) 2014, Slate.
NEW YORK — You've probably heard about Heartbleed by now. It's big, bad wolf of an Internet security problem. And though it's mainly server managers who have to take steps to fix it, you can manage your passwords to help protect yourself.

The strangest thing about Heartbleed is that changing your password on a particular site only gives you more protection if that site has already applied to the Heartbleed patch and resolved its vulnerability. If it hasn't, changing your password in advance could theoretically put you at greater risk. Heartbleed is a vulnerability in a server's memory (RAM), not its data storage, so a hacker has access to things that are being called up by the server not everything that's stored on it. That means that the hacker could ascertain your new password, too.

Lists, which are being frequently updated, can tell you which websites are vulnerable and which have been patched. Once a site is no longer vulnerable, it's time to change your password. You're going to have to do this on a lot of sites, so this is the perfect time so start using a password manager.

A password manager helps you generate random, strong passwords so you don't have to think of them yourself. Then it stores your login information for every site you use, autofilling a password whenever you need one. You don't need to know or remember your passwords, because they're all stored and protected behind one master password that you make extremely strong and unguessable. I use 1Password, and my master password is a fairly long sentence (without spaces) that includes alternate spellings, numbers in place of certain letters, and punctuation.

I'll admit it. I kind of hate using a password manager. Setting it up is tedious, and it's a little unsettling to never know any of your passwords. It doesn't matter so much when you're on your personal computer and have 1Password (or your password manager of choice) running, but when you're using someone else's computer, you have to use a an app to check your password for any site/service you want to log into.

Password managers aren't about fun, though. They're about proactively protecting yourself from much more annoying, and potentially detrimental, problems down the line if your personal information gets hijacked. And they do offer a lot of useful features like super secure notes and a password generator. Many even incorporate two-factor authentication, and in our leaky digital world, it's reassuring to use a service whose only priority is security.

Good options for password managers include LastPass, Dashlane, 1Password, Roboform, SplashID, mSecure, and KeePass. There's initial effort to get your password library going, but once it's up and running it won't get in your way. And it might save you some heartache, if not Heartbleed, sometime.

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http://on.mash.to/PTgjhh

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Newman is lead blogger for Future Tense, a partnership of Slate, New America and Arizona State University.

 

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