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Texas has old, new candidates to offer as presidential hopefuls

The Republican Party has long been riven between its establishment and conservative wings, a split that plays out every four years in the race for the White House.

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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

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Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

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Two Fort Worth Baylor medical properties acquired

Baylor Surgical Hospital of Fort Worth and Baylor Surgical Hospital Integrated Medical Facility are among three facilities acquired by Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II Inc.

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New Isis theater has new owner

The New Isis Theater. Photo by Robert Francis

Scott Nishimura
snishimura@bizpress.net

Aledo investor Larry White Jr. has purchased the historic New Isis theater in the Fort Worth Stockyards. 

White bought the 11,780-square-foot building and site at 2401 N. Main St. from Anastasia Talsma, who had the property listed for sale for years.

White holds the distinction of being the only purchaser of all four grand champion animals at the Fort Worth Stock Show’s annual Sale of Champions. White could not be immediately reached for comment.

Trey Presswood of Panther Real Estate Solutions represented Talsma. Eric Walsh of HGC Commercial represented White.

The Tarrant Appraisal District valued the property at $438,170 for market purposes in its 2014 valuations. The building was constructed in 1936 replacing a previous theater on the site. 

According to J'Nell Pate's Fort Worth Stockyards book, the building traces its roots to a medicine show at the stockyards. Louis Tidball, a North Fort Worth banker, took over the medicine show when t he owner was unable to pay  off a loan. A film show that was part of the medicine show was a part of the medicine show and Tidball then built the original building in 1913. 
 

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