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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

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Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

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Two Fort Worth Baylor medical properties acquired

Baylor Surgical Hospital of Fort Worth and Baylor Surgical Hospital Integrated Medical Facility are among three facilities acquired by Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II Inc.

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Fort Worth minority business receives nationwide grant

Cuevas Distribution Inc., a minority- and woman-owned business in Fort Worth, is one of 20 small businesses nationwide to receive a $150,000 grant from Chase as part of the Mission Main Street program.

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Airlines' on-time record took a beating in Feb.

 

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) — The bad news for travelers is that U.S. airlines posted terrible on-time numbers and record cancelations in February, as winter storms fouled operations at several large airports.

The good news is that no U.S. flights were stuck on airport tarmacs for more than the three hours, the limit set by federal rules.

The U.S. Department of Transportation reported Thursday that only 70.7 percent of domestic flights arrived within 14 minutes of schedule — that's the leeway allowed while still being counted as on-time.

The on-time rate fell sharply from the 79.6 percent in February 2013 but was better than January 2014's 67.7 percent mark.

Airlines reported 23,719 canceled flights, or 5.5 percent of all scheduled departures, the highest rate for February since the government started keeping track in 1995, according to the Transportation Department.

"We faced historically bad weather in February — literally the worst we have seen — with snow and ice storms nearly every day somewhere in the system," said Jean Medina, spokeswoman for the airline industry trade group Airlines for America. "There were many times when it was simply not safe to operate, driving record cancellations."

Medina said it was remarkable that there were no violations of the tarmac-delay rules, which prohibit ground delays of more than three hours for domestic flights or four hours for international ones.

Hawaiian Airlines had the best on-time rating — it usually does, being insulated from most of the mainland's bad weather — at 90.1 percent. Regional airline ExpressJet ranked last at 59 percent on-time.

Among the largest five airlines, Delta was on-time most often, followed by American, US Airways, Southwest and United.

One in every nine flights on ExpressJet and one in 11 on American Eagle were canceled. Regional airlines fly smaller planes and are usually the first to have flights canceled during bad weather.

Reports of mishandled baggage and complaints were both up from a year earlier.

The government figures are compiled from 14 airlines that each operate at least 1 percent of all domestic flights. They exclude Spirit Airlines, Allegiant Air and many regional carriers.

 

 

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