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New arena at Will Rogers takes shape


The proposed Will Rogers Memorial Center arena continues to take shape as voters head for a Nov. 4 election to decide whether to approve new taxes to help pay for the $450 million facility.

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Cooking Class: Fort Worth chef brings home the gold

Toques off to Timothy Prefontaine. The executive chef at the iconic Fort Worth Club is currently the best in the nation, according to the American Culinary Federation. Prefontaine earned the title of 2014 U.S.A.’s Chef of the

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Fort Worth-based Woodmont plans $80M Hard Rock Hotel retail center

Woodmont Outlets of Fort Worth, an affiliate of The Woodmont Co., has partnered with Cherokee Nation Businesses for a proposed upscale retail development at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

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Fort Worth firm 'simplifies' advertising

Reaching customers requires more than price slashing and flashy ads. In today’s competitive marketplace, machines – not men and women – are essential to tapping new markets and

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Trinity Valley School leader to leave in May 2015

Gary Krahn, head of school for the past eight years at Trinity Valley School in Fort Worth, will leave his position in May 2015 when he and his wife Paula will move

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Airlines' on-time record took a beating in Feb.

 

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) — The bad news for travelers is that U.S. airlines posted terrible on-time numbers and record cancelations in February, as winter storms fouled operations at several large airports.

The good news is that no U.S. flights were stuck on airport tarmacs for more than the three hours, the limit set by federal rules.

The U.S. Department of Transportation reported Thursday that only 70.7 percent of domestic flights arrived within 14 minutes of schedule — that's the leeway allowed while still being counted as on-time.

The on-time rate fell sharply from the 79.6 percent in February 2013 but was better than January 2014's 67.7 percent mark.

Airlines reported 23,719 canceled flights, or 5.5 percent of all scheduled departures, the highest rate for February since the government started keeping track in 1995, according to the Transportation Department.

"We faced historically bad weather in February — literally the worst we have seen — with snow and ice storms nearly every day somewhere in the system," said Jean Medina, spokeswoman for the airline industry trade group Airlines for America. "There were many times when it was simply not safe to operate, driving record cancellations."

Medina said it was remarkable that there were no violations of the tarmac-delay rules, which prohibit ground delays of more than three hours for domestic flights or four hours for international ones.

Hawaiian Airlines had the best on-time rating — it usually does, being insulated from most of the mainland's bad weather — at 90.1 percent. Regional airline ExpressJet ranked last at 59 percent on-time.

Among the largest five airlines, Delta was on-time most often, followed by American, US Airways, Southwest and United.

One in every nine flights on ExpressJet and one in 11 on American Eagle were canceled. Regional airlines fly smaller planes and are usually the first to have flights canceled during bad weather.

Reports of mishandled baggage and complaints were both up from a year earlier.

The government figures are compiled from 14 airlines that each operate at least 1 percent of all domestic flights. They exclude Spirit Airlines, Allegiant Air and many regional carriers.

 

 

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What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?