Join The Discussion

 

Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

read more >

UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

read more >

Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

read more >

Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

read more >

Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

read more >

Behind the changing fashion of 'Mad Men'

Add

During the past six seasons of the television show "Mad Men," audiences and fashion designers alike have obsessed over the cast's retro wardrobe.
Credit: Courtesy AMC

In this promotional photo for the seventh season, Joan opts out of the "it dress" of the 1960s -- a mini-skirted A-line that "made everyone look stumpy," Przybyszewski said. In order to carry off the look of the day, many women lost weight to emulate models like Twiggy, she said.
Credit: Courtesy AMC

Ann Hoevel

CNN

(CNN) -- During the past six seasons of the television show "Mad Men," audiences and fashion designers alike have obsessed over the cast's retro wardrobe.

So has Linda Przybyszewski, a University of Notre Dame history professor and the author of the upcoming book, "The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish."

The 1960s, the decade that "Mad Men" has inhabited thus far, was a time of tremendous upheaval that challenged the principles of the past -- and the fashions, she said. As women and African-Americans fought for social equality and men struggled to normalize their home and work lives, everyone's clothing changed.

We asked Przybyszewski to weigh in on how the "Mad Men" wardrobe evolved, and clue us in to what those shifts said about the time.

Fans don't yet know in what years the show's final season will take place, but count on some bold, colorful changes.

After all, at the start there were "four guys essentially wearing identical suits, and now we have four guys each one of them with distinctive facial hair, color, cut, garment," she said. "That's what the '60s did."

< back

Email   email
hide
Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?