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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Fort Worth Chamber names Small Business of the Year winners

A trampoline recreation business; an oilfield services company; a longtime aviation maintenance firm; a maker of electrical wiring harnesses. Those were the wide variety of businesses that received the 2015 Small Business of the Year Award from the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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AT&T reports 1Q; lost contract subscribers

 

DALLAS (AP) — AT&T lost phone subscribers from its contract-based plans for the first time in the latest quarter, in a sign that growth in the industry is stalling now that most Americans have smartphones.

The company said Tuesday that it added a net 296,000 devices to its contract-based plans in the first quarter, but the gain was due entirely to tablets, which carry lower monthly fees.

Excluding tablets, the carrier lost a net 69,000 devices from its contract-based plans, the first such loss.

When AT&T was the only U.S. carrier with the iPhone between 2007 and 2011, it regularly added more than the 1 million net new devices to its contract-based plans per quarter.

Overall, the shift resulted in slower growth in what people pay on average for each device every month. Average revenue per user under contract rose 0.9 percent, down from a 1.9 percent gain in the fourth quarter through December.

The results mean AT&T, the nation's second largest wireless carrier, is slipping further behind market leader Verizon Wireless, which said last week that it added a net 677,000 devices to contract-based plans in the quarter.

Verizon ended the quarter with 93.2 million devices under contract compared to 70.7 million for AT&T.

The results came as AT&T reported a 3 percent gain in net income to $3.7 billion, or 67 cents per share, for the quarter that ended March 31.

Excluding the sale of an advertising business, adjusted earnings came to 64 cents per share, matching the expectation of analysts polled by FactSet.

Revenue fell nearly 2 percent to $31.36 billion, below the $31.74 billion that analysts were looking for. Excluding the ad business sale, revenue would have risen 0.9 percent.

"We had a solid start to the year," Chief Financial Officer John Stephens told analysts on a conference call.

AT&T racked up 6 million smartphone activations in the quarter, including 4.8 million iPhones. That was lower than the busy Christmas quarter in which it had a record 10.2 million smartphone activations, of which 8.6 million were iPhones.

Stephens acknowledged that the addition of more tablets to the network is negatively affecting average per-device spending. He said that low-price cellular data plans for tablets may not be permanent.

"We put that in place to see how it would work, to stimulate demand," he said. "I won't suggest to you that it is a permanent offering, but I will suggest to you we will continue to monitor it and make our decisions as we go forward."

Shares of the Dallas company fell 1.8 percent to $38.31 in after-hours trading following the release of the earnings report.
 

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