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Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

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Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

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UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

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Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

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Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

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Wal-Mart sues Visa for $5 billion over 'swipe fees'

Chris Isidore

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- In a battle of retailing titans, Wal-Mart Stores is suing Visa, accusing the credit card company of conspiring with banks to fix prices on the processing fees retailers are charged.

Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, says Visa's price fixing cost it at least $5 billion in damages. And since the case is a federal antitrust case, it is seeking damages three times that amount or $15 billion.

Visa, MasterCard and major banks reached a tentative settlement with many retailers in July 2012; the card companies agreed to pay up to $7.25 billion and lower the fees they charge stores. That settlement was approved by a federal judge last December.

But many retailers both large and small criticized the settlement, claiming it did not properly compensate them for the damage done by the market power of the credit card companies.

Some major retailers, including Wal-Mart, Target and Amazon, opted-out of the settlement.

Wal-Mart's suit, filed in federal court in its home state of Arkansas Thursday, is the next step in the court battle that has dragged on for more than eight years.

A Visa spokesman said the company had no comment on the suit.

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Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?