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Ebby Halliday acquires Fort Worth’s Williams Trew

Williams Trew Real Estate of Fort Worth has been acquired by Dallas-based residential real estate brokerage Ebby Halliday Real Estate Inc.

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T&P Warehouse: Historic building remains in limbo as area redevelops

For years, the historic T&P Warehouse on West Lancaster Avenue downtown, built in 1931 to house freight for the Texas Pacific Railway, has sat vacant and deteriorating.

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Meridian Bank Texas parent acquired by UMB Financial for $182.5M

Kansas City, Mo.-based UMB Financial Corp., the parent company of UMB Bank, said Dec. 15 it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Marquette Financial Companies in an all-stock transaction.

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Susan Halsey, Fort Worth attorney, business leader, dies

Susan Halsey, a Fort Worth attorney who was also a community and business leader, died on Friday, Dec. 19. Halsey, 55, was chairman for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce in 2013-2014, leading the chamber during a year

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Heating up: West Lancaster corridor projects moving forward

West Lancaster Avenue through downtown Fort Worth is heating up, with planners envisioning a lively mixed-use corridor that extends the central business district further south.

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Wal-Mart sues Visa for $5 billion over 'swipe fees'

Chris Isidore

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- In a battle of retailing titans, Wal-Mart Stores is suing Visa, accusing the credit card company of conspiring with banks to fix prices on the processing fees retailers are charged.

Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, says Visa's price fixing cost it at least $5 billion in damages. And since the case is a federal antitrust case, it is seeking damages three times that amount or $15 billion.

Visa, MasterCard and major banks reached a tentative settlement with many retailers in July 2012; the card companies agreed to pay up to $7.25 billion and lower the fees they charge stores. That settlement was approved by a federal judge last December.

But many retailers both large and small criticized the settlement, claiming it did not properly compensate them for the damage done by the market power of the credit card companies.

Some major retailers, including Wal-Mart, Target and Amazon, opted-out of the settlement.

Wal-Mart's suit, filed in federal court in its home state of Arkansas Thursday, is the next step in the court battle that has dragged on for more than eight years.

A Visa spokesman said the company had no comment on the suit.

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TCU/Baylor
Did the College Football Playoff Committee get it right?