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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Fort Worth draws closer to deal with Lancaster developer

City staff are planning to introduce the developer Feb. 3 at a meeting of the City Council's Housing and Economic Development Committee.

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Compass BBVA names Happel CEO for Fort Worth

BBVA Compass has appointed Brian Happel, most recently the Fort Worth city president, its chief executive officer of Fort Worth.

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Fort Worth minority business receives nationwide grant

Cuevas Distribution Inc., a minority- and woman-owned business in Fort Worth, is one of 20 small businesses nationwide to receive a $150,000 grant from Chase as part of the Mission Main Street program.

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Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

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JPMorgan selling physical commodities business

NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan said on Wednesday that it has made a deal to sell its physical commodities business for $3.5 billion as regulators weigh whether to restrict banks' ability to control power plants, warehouses, and oil refineries.

If it's approved by regulators, the deal would put the commodities business in the hands of energy and commodities trading company Mercuria Energy Group Ltd.

Big banks have long profited from price swings in metals, energy, and other commodities. But some had branched out into owning physical facilities. Last summer JPMorgan said that the possibility of new regulations on whether banks could continue to do that was a factor behind its decision to consider selling some of its physical commodities business, which includes metals and energy assets. The Federal Reserve in January said it would consider new regulations.

JPMorgan Chase & Co. said Wednesday that after the sale it will still provide traditional banking activities in the commodities markets. It will also continue to make markets, provide liquidity and risk management and offer advice to global companies and institutions.

The deal, which is not expected to have a material impact on JPMorgan's earnings, is targeted to close in the third quarter.

JPMorgan shares rose 24 cents to $58.30 on Wednesday. Its shares have risen about 19 percent over the past year.

 

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