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Super PAC Men: How political consultants took a Fort Worth oilman on a wild ride

The head of a Texas oil dynasty joined the parade of wealthy political donors, aiming to flip the Senate to Republicans. By the time consultants were done with him, the war chest was drained and fraud allegations were flying

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Bridge collapse on I-35 north of Austin

SALADO, Texas (AP) — Emergency crews are responding to a reported bridge collapse along an interstate in Central Texas.

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Amazon begins Prime Now program in Dallas area

If you just have to have it now, as in one hour, you can, at least in the Dallas area, as Amazon.com Inc. announced Thursday it will offer Prime Now.

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Latin-inspired restaurant set to open in downtown Fort Worth

Downtown Fort Worth’s dining scene is about to get spicier with the opening of a new restaurant featuring Latin-inspired coastal cuisine.

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Texas jobless rate falls as employers add workers

Texas unemployment fell to 4.3 percent during February for the sixth straight month of declines, the Texas Workforce Commission reported Friday.

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Jimi Hendrix gets his own 'Forever' stamp

Katie Lobosco

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Jimi Hendrix fans have something to celebrate.

The U.S. Postal service released an limited-edition Forever stamp Thursday featuring the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer.

The stamp comes out decades after the musician died in 1970, when a stamp cost just 6 cents. Today, one costs 49 cents.

It is designed to resemble a vintage 45 rpm record sleeve and shows Hendrix wearing one of his trademark military jackets and playing a guitar.

"Jimi Hendrix helped found three new genres of music — heavy metal, jazz fusion and funk — and in doing so, left behind an indelible mark on pop music and popular culture generally," said Joseph Corbett, CFO and executive vice president at the postal service, in a release.

The stamp will be unveiled at the SXSW conference Thursday with a concert including celebrity guitarists like Guns N' Roses' Slash and Robby Krieger of the Doors.

Last year, the Postal Service honored other musicians such as Johnny Cash, Ray Charles and Lydia Mendoza as part of its new music icons series. Janis Joplin is expected to be added to the list this year.

The agency is hopeful that excitement over the musician series might get more people to buy stamps as it grapples with deep financial problems and looks to find new revenue streams.

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