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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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Cold snap knocks Texas electric generators offline

Texas wind turbines. 

CHRIS TOMLINSON, Associated Press


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — January's polar vortex knocked several important coal-fired electricity plants in Texas offline, and the Sierra Club on Tuesday said the loss of power shows the state needs more wind turbines and energy conservation programs to avoid possible rolling blackouts.

The Electricity Reliability Council of Texas, which operates the grid that supplies electricity to 85 percent of Texans, issued a report on Friday detailing how six coal-fired plants either shut down or failed to provide the energy expected on Jan. 6, when a cold air mass brought frigid temperatures to Texas.

The temperature did not drop as low as it did in February 2011, when ERCOT resorted to rolling blackouts due to lack of power, but the sudden loss of power on Jan. 6 triggered an Energy Emergency Alert. Frozen instruments were the most-cited problem for why the plants shut down or failed to produce as expected.

Al Armendariz of the Sierra Club said wind energy and conservation efforts, known as demand response, proved their value.

"This new report from ERCOT shows that clean energy solutions, especially clean, cheap Texas wind and demand response performed as expected and under pressure, whereas numerous coal-fired and gas-fired power plants across the state couldn't handle the January cold snap," he said.

Conservative lawmakers in Austin have complained about tax breaks provided to wind companies, while generators have complained that low natural gas prices make it economically unfeasible to improve their existing plants or build new ones. Environmentalists want to shut down older coal plants, which they say create too much pollution.

The blackouts in February 2011 led to special legislative hearings, and power generators promised to weatherize their equipment to prevent future outages. ERCOT fined Luminant $750,000 for failing to supply the power it promised.

In January, the Lower Colorado River Authority's Sandy Creek coal-powered plant was the largest to go offline, along with two plants owned by Luminant and one owned by NRG. Other plants failed to produce as much energy as expected, creating an emergency, ERCOT's report said.

"The main contributing cause was the substantial amount of resource capacity lost," it said. "ERCOT has already (re)visited generation sites who immediately indicated performance issues related to the weather, and has scheduled to visit the others."

One of the major challenges for generators is the extreme swings in Texas weather. Designing and maintaining a power plant so that it can operate in August's high temperatures, when demand is greatest, is very different from ensuring the same plant won't shut down in cold weather.

Operators have called on the Public Utility Commission to change the state's electricity market to encourage construction of new plants. Electric utilities currently only pay for the power they use, while generators want to be paid to keep reserves available in extreme weather situations such as those on Jan. 6.

Consumer groups, environmentalists and businesses oppose creating a so-called capacity market.

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