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Moves by Jeb Bush add to talk of 2016 candidacy

WASHINGTON — Jeb Bush's decision to release a policy-laden e-book and all his emails from his time as governor of Florida has further stoked expectations among his allies that he will launch a presidential bid.

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Ebby Halliday acquires Fort Worth’s Williams Trew

Williams Trew Real Estate of Fort Worth has been acquired by Dallas-based residential real estate brokerage Ebby Halliday Real Estate Inc.

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Taking the Cake: Sundance had pursued Cheesecake Factory for many years

The Cheesecake Factory had been on the white board over at Sundance Square management for some time

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Fort Worth businessman to lead Abbott, Patrick inauguration efforts

Fort Worth businessman Ardon Moore will chair the committee running inauguration festivities for Gov.-elect Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov.-elect Dan Patrick in January, it was announced on Friday.   Moore, president of Lee M. Bass Inc. in Fort Worth, is a vice chairman of the University of Texas Investment

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Meridian Bank Texas parent acquired by UMB Financial for $182.5M

Kansas City, Mo.-based UMB Financial Corp., the parent company of UMB Bank, said Dec. 15 it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Marquette Financial Companies in an all-stock transaction.

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Update: American says landing rights brought $381 million

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) – The CEO of American Airlines says his company is getting $381 million from selling takeoff and landing rights at New York's LaGuardia Airport and Reagan National Airport outside Washington.

Doug Parker said his airline was paid more than it expected to get for the rights – called slots – at the busy airports.

The U.S. Justice Department put a higher figure – more than $425 million – on American's gain. Parker said that the government might have added the value of slots that American picked up at New York's Kennedy Airport, "That's their valuation, not ours." The Justice Department did not immediately comment.

In comments filed Monday in federal district court in Washington, the Justice Department said the value of the slots proved that it drove a hard bargain last year when it settled its antitrust lawsuit against the merger of American and US Airways. The airlines agreed to give up some of their slots at LaGuardia and Reagan and two gates each at airports in Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Miami and Dallas.

The Justice Department said that American's sale of the LaGuardia slots to Southwest Airlines Co. and Virgin America is complete, while the transfer of Reagan slots to Southwest, JetBlue Airways Corp. and Virgin America is expected to wrap up soon. Each airline had announced that it won bidding for the slots, but the sale prices were not disclosed. American traded some of the Reagan slots to JetBlue for slots at Kennedy Airport, a deal that Parker said was underway before the lawsuit.

Slots at Reagan, LaGuardia, Kennedy and the Newark, New Jersey, airport are limited by the government, making them valuable when they hit the market. A pair of slots is needed for each round-trip flight.

Parker told an investor conference in New York that the slots had been recently appraised at $225 million, so getting $381 million was "great news."

Consumer groups, lawmakers, the Detroit airport and Delta Air Lines Inc. lodged complaints about the settlement.

Some consumer groups complained that the settlement didn't go far enough to protect travelers.

The Justice Department said that after reviewing public comments, it still believes that the settlement will offset any lost competition from allowing the nation's third-biggest and fifth-biggest airlines to combine. The merger made American Airlines Group Inc. the world's biggest airline operator.

Federal law requires a 60-day public-comment period after the government settles an antitrust lawsuit. Even critics of the merger had low expectations that their complaints would change the outcome, however.

 

 

 

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Did the College Football Playoff Committee get it right?