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Ex Rangers manager Washington apologizes for 'breaking wife's trust'

IRVING, Texas (AP) — Former Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington says he is embarrassed for 'breaking his wife's trust.'

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Troubled RadioShack files SEC form, talks with 'major vendor'

RadioShack Corp.’s latest filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission describes recent discussions that “could be beneficial to the financial restructuring of the company.”

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Road Show: City leaders prepare campaign to corral votes for $450 million arena

Fort Worth’s biggest backers of a new arena at the Will Rogers Memorial Center are leaving little to the chance of a “no” vote in a citywide election Nov. 4 to decide on new fees that would fund 15 percent of the $450 million project.

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Texas Health Southwest breaks ground on $40M expansion

A $40 million expansion of Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Southwest Fort Worth is under way, with groundbreaking ceremonies held this week.

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Overland Sheepskin opening Sundance Square store in Fort Worth

The store is expected to open by the holidays, Sundance said.

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House GOP moves to block EPA rules on power plants 


MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a long-expected skirmish, House Republicans are moving to block President Barack Obama's plan to limit carbon pollution from new power plants.

A bill targeting the power plant rule is slated for a vote on the House floor Thursday as GOP lawmakers fight back against what they call the Obama administration's "war on coal." Obama's proposal, a key part of his plan to fight climate change, would set the first national limits on heat-trapping pollution from future power plants.

A measure sponsored by Rep. Ed Whitfield of Kentucky, chairman of a House subcommittee on energy and power, would require the Environmental Protection Agency to set carbon emissions standards based on technology that has been in use for at least a year. Republicans and some coal-state Democrats say the EPA rule is based on carbon-capturing technology that does not currently exist.

Whitfield called the power plant proposal "one of the most extreme regulations of the Obama administration," adding that it would "make it impossible to build a new coal-fired power plant in America."

The White House has threatened to veto the measure, saying it would "undermine public health protections of the Clean Air Act and stop U.S. progress in cutting dangerous carbon pollution from power plants." Power plants account for about one-third of U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming.

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and other officials have said the proposed rule — the first of two major regulations aimed at limiting carbon pollution from power plants — is based on carbon reduction methods that are "technically feasible" and under development in at least four sites. The rule affecting future plants is a prelude to a more ambitious plan, expected later this year, to control carbon pollution at existing power plants.

In January, McCarthy told the Senate Environment Committee: "We looked at the data available. We looked at the technologies. We made a determination that (carbon capture and storage technology) was the best system for emission reductions for coal facilities moving forward, because it was technically feasible and it would lead to significant emission reductions."

Whitfield and other critics dispute that, saying carbon capture technology is years away from being commercially viable.

The EPA rule would "mandate (emission) control technologies for power plants that are not yet commercially available, effectively banning new coal-fired power plants ... and setting a dangerous precedent that could cascade to other fuels," the National Association of Manufacturers said in a letter supporting Whitfield's bill.

But environmental groups said the bill would gut the EPA's authority to reduce carbon pollution.

"The bill sets up impossible tests for any EPA standard reducing carbon pollution to meet and allows utilities to decide what regulations will be for new power plants — effectively delaying the best emissions reductions technology for years or even decades," the League of Conservation Voters said in a letter urging lawmakers to oppose the bill.

The Republican-controlled House is likely to approve the Whitfield bill, but the fate of a companion measure sponsored by Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., is less certain.

Manchin said his bill would ensure that pollution standards imposed by the EPA are realistic, calling the current proposal "unattainable under today's technology."

 

 

 

 

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Arena
What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?