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Super PAC Men: How political consultants took a Fort Worth oilman on a wild ride

The head of a Texas oil dynasty joined the parade of wealthy political donors, aiming to flip the Senate to Republicans. By the time consultants were done with him, the war chest was drained and fraud allegations were flying

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Bridge collapse on I-35 north of Austin

SALADO, Texas (AP) — Emergency crews are responding to a reported bridge collapse along an interstate in Central Texas.

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Latin-inspired restaurant set to open in downtown Fort Worth

Downtown Fort Worth’s dining scene is about to get spicier with the opening of a new restaurant featuring Latin-inspired coastal cuisine.

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Amazon begins Prime Now program in Dallas area

If you just have to have it now, as in one hour, you can, at least in the Dallas area, as Amazon.com Inc. announced Thursday it will offer Prime Now.

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Texas jobless rate falls as employers add workers

Texas unemployment fell to 4.3 percent during February for the sixth straight month of declines, the Texas Workforce Commission reported Friday.

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FAA approves 787 Dreamliner battery fixes

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney) -- The Federal Aviation Administration cleared Boeing to make fixes to the battery system of the 787 Dreamliner. That paves the way for the aircraft to start flying again.
Nearly 50 Dreamliners have been grounded for the last four months, after two fires on Japanese jets prompted the FAA to order the planes grounded on Jan. 16.
Since then, Boeing has redesigned the battery system. Next week, all airlines that have the 787 aircraft will start to install the new systems.
Boeing basically revamped the internal battery components to minimize the chances of a short circuit. It also improved the insulation of the battery cells, and created a new "containment and venting" system that is supposed to prevent overheating from affecting the plane.
"Safety of the traveling public is our number one priority. These changes to the 787 battery will ensure the safety of the aircraft and its passengers," said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.
The move to approve the planes for flight has been expected. FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta predicted at a Senate hearing on Tuesday that it would happen soon.
Boeing has already completed 20 test flights with the new battery technology, Huerta said during that hearing.
United Airlines, which has six of the jets, is the only U.S. airline to take delivery of the Dreamliners so far. Boeing's customers are eager to get them into service, since they use lightweight composite materials that greatly improve fuel economy.
The Dreamliner has sold well in Asia and the Middle East, where airlines depend on long-range flights for much of their business, and can benefit most from the improvements in fuel economy.
The problems with the new battery technology have already prompted Boeing's European rival Airbus to revert to standard nickel-cadmium batteries in its A350 plane. The A350 had been designed to compete with the Dreamliner, and is due to make its first test flight in the middle of this year.
The approval for the battery fix comes just a few days before the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates traffic and aircraft incidents, will convene for a two-day investigation into the fires.
Boeing's shares were up 2 precent Friday afternoon.

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