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Mixed-use complex at Fort Worth TRE parking lot could cost $60 million

A design panel proposes two buildings on Trinity Railway Express lot on Near Southside, with a mix of apartments, retail, office and parking, and frontage on West Vickery and views across I-30 and overlooking downtown.

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Sundance Square prepares for time in college football spotlight

ESPN is bringing its College GameDay broadcast to Sundance Square to open and close the college football season this year.

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TCU's Neeley School receives $30M donation as part of planned expansion

A $30 million foundation gift to Texas Christian University will help guide a $100 million facility expansion for the Neeley School of Business.

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Neece Brown named interim president of Arts Council of Fort Worth

Cathy Neece Brown has been named interim president of The Arts Council of Fort Worth, replacing Jody Ulich, who will depart this month to become the director of Convention and Cultural Services in Sacramento, Calif.

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Fort Worth-area human resource awards seeks nominations

The Fort Worth Human Resource Management Association (FWHRMA) has announced their inaugural Human Resource Professional of the Year Award.

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FAA approves 787 Dreamliner battery fixes

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney) -- The Federal Aviation Administration cleared Boeing to make fixes to the battery system of the 787 Dreamliner. That paves the way for the aircraft to start flying again.
Nearly 50 Dreamliners have been grounded for the last four months, after two fires on Japanese jets prompted the FAA to order the planes grounded on Jan. 16.
Since then, Boeing has redesigned the battery system. Next week, all airlines that have the 787 aircraft will start to install the new systems.
Boeing basically revamped the internal battery components to minimize the chances of a short circuit. It also improved the insulation of the battery cells, and created a new "containment and venting" system that is supposed to prevent overheating from affecting the plane.
"Safety of the traveling public is our number one priority. These changes to the 787 battery will ensure the safety of the aircraft and its passengers," said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.
The move to approve the planes for flight has been expected. FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta predicted at a Senate hearing on Tuesday that it would happen soon.
Boeing has already completed 20 test flights with the new battery technology, Huerta said during that hearing.
United Airlines, which has six of the jets, is the only U.S. airline to take delivery of the Dreamliners so far. Boeing's customers are eager to get them into service, since they use lightweight composite materials that greatly improve fuel economy.
The Dreamliner has sold well in Asia and the Middle East, where airlines depend on long-range flights for much of their business, and can benefit most from the improvements in fuel economy.
The problems with the new battery technology have already prompted Boeing's European rival Airbus to revert to standard nickel-cadmium batteries in its A350 plane. The A350 had been designed to compete with the Dreamliner, and is due to make its first test flight in the middle of this year.
The approval for the battery fix comes just a few days before the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates traffic and aircraft incidents, will convene for a two-day investigation into the fires.
Boeing's shares were up 2 precent Friday afternoon.

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What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?