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Obama calls for offshore drilling in Southeast

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday outlined a politically fraught plan for allowing oil and gas drilling offshore along parts of the Atlantic coast while imposing new restrictions on environmentally fragile waters off northern Alaska.

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Alliance's Hillwood Commons lands first tenant

A large title insurance, property valuation and settlement services company is the first tenant at Hillwood Commons I, an office complex at Alliance Town Center.

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Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

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Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

Energy Transfer Partners LP of Dallas and Regency Energy Partners LP have entered into a definitive merger agreement.

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Fort Worth's mayor looking for new chief of staff

Jason Lamers is leaving the city after 14 years to join Burlington Northern Santa Fe.

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Fort Worth energy firm files suit against city of Dallas

 

 

Trinity East Energy of Fort Worth on Thursday filed a lawsuit against the city of Dallas after the company paid more than $19 million to secure oil and gas leases on city property, only to have drilling permits on three separate tracts denied by the Dallas City Council.


The lawsuit claims breach of contract, fraud and unconstitutional taking/inverse condemnation stemming from written and oral assurances made by former Dallas City Manager Mary Suhm and other Dallas officials in support of Trinity East Energy's plan to drill for natural gas in the Barnett Shale geological formation deep under 3,600 acres of uninhabited and undeveloped portions of west Dallas.
According to the lawsuit, Trinity East ultimately invested more than $30 million in an attempt to extract natural gas conveyed to the company through its lease purchases. The company's total losses over the lifetime of the wells exceed several hundred million dollars.


The saga began in 2007, when Dallas city leaders raised much-needed revenue by asking energy companies, including Trinity East, to submit proposals to lease city property and drill for oil and gas. Trinity East officials say they worked closely with city officials to design the necessary system of equipment on remote, uninhabited city property, much of which is in a flood plain and cannot be developed.
 

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