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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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Fort Worth energy firm files suit against city of Dallas

 

 

Trinity East Energy of Fort Worth on Thursday filed a lawsuit against the city of Dallas after the company paid more than $19 million to secure oil and gas leases on city property, only to have drilling permits on three separate tracts denied by the Dallas City Council.


The lawsuit claims breach of contract, fraud and unconstitutional taking/inverse condemnation stemming from written and oral assurances made by former Dallas City Manager Mary Suhm and other Dallas officials in support of Trinity East Energy's plan to drill for natural gas in the Barnett Shale geological formation deep under 3,600 acres of uninhabited and undeveloped portions of west Dallas.
According to the lawsuit, Trinity East ultimately invested more than $30 million in an attempt to extract natural gas conveyed to the company through its lease purchases. The company's total losses over the lifetime of the wells exceed several hundred million dollars.


The saga began in 2007, when Dallas city leaders raised much-needed revenue by asking energy companies, including Trinity East, to submit proposals to lease city property and drill for oil and gas. Trinity East officials say they worked closely with city officials to design the necessary system of equipment on remote, uninhabited city property, much of which is in a flood plain and cannot be developed.
 

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