Join The Discussion

 

Fort Worth's TPG takes controlling interest in Hollywood, sports powerhouse

A Fort Worth firm has gone Hollywood.

read more >

Downtown Fort Worth TIF reaches parking agreement with four garages

The TIF board will meet Oct. 29 to consider the agreements.

read more >

Oil price drop goes unnoticed in Texas' Eagle Ford shale

CUERO, Texas — From her vantage point of the U.S. shale oil boom, Jill Potts doesn't see anything to worry about.

read more >

Renovated Daniel-Meyer to put TCU basketball in the spotlight

You might say the Texas Christian University men’s basketball team was the sacrificial lamb in the university’s football-motivated move from the Mountain West Conference to the Big 12 Conference. The rising

read more >

E-Mist finds focus: Ebola gives infection control start-up its moment in spotlight

In the space of 72 hours, George Robertson found his company’s products on the cover of The New York Times and himself on CNN and WFAA, along with innumerable mentions in various media around the world.

read more >

Broad coalition backs Keystone XL oil pipeline

 

MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press

 

 


WASHINGTON (AP) — An unusual coalition of lawmakers from both parties, labor and business leaders, veterans groups and Canada's ambassador to the United States joined forces Tuesday to push for quick approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

Five Democrats joined Republicans at a Capitol news conference to urge President Barack Obama to approve the pipeline following a State Department report last week that raised no major environmental objections. The $7 billion pipeline would carry oil from tar sands in western Canada to refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast. The project has lingered for more than five years and has become a symbol of the political debate over climate change.

Canadian Ambassador Gary Doer also spoke at the news conference, along with labor union officials and a retired Navy admiral. A top oil industry lobbyist attended the event but did not speak.

Environmental groups that oppose the pipeline have been making a lot of "noise," Doer said, but polls show a majority of Americans favor the project. Pipeline opponents, including many Democratic lawmakers, say it would carry heavy oil that contributes to global warming. They also worry about a spill.

Doer urged Obama to "choose blue-collar workers over Hollywood celebrities" and accept crude oil from Canada — the closest U.S ally — over oil from Venezuela. Robert Redford and Daryl Hannah are among scores of celebrities who have spoken out against the pipeline.

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., said the time to build the pipeline "is now," adding that pipelines are safer and more environmentally friendly than oil that is transported by trains or trucks.

Keystone XL, proposed by Calgary-based TransCanada Corp., not only would create jobs and boost her state's economy, it also would "connect two of the strongest allies in the world," Landrieu said.

"I would swap Canada for Venezuela any day of the week and twice on Sunday," added Rep. John Barrow, D-Ga., another pipeline supporter.

A report released Friday by the State Department cited no major environmental objections to the 1,179-mile pipeline, which would carry oil through Montana and South Dakota to a hub in Nebraska, where it would connect with existing pipelines to get the oil to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast.

Pipeline supporters say it will create thousands of jobs and move the U.S. toward North American energy independence.

Foes say the pipeline would carry "dirty oil" that contributes to global warming. The State Department report says oil derived from tar sands in Alberta generates about 17 percent more greenhouse gas emissions than traditional crude. But the report makes clear that other methods of transporting the oil — including rail, trucks and barges — would release more greenhouse gases than the pipeline.

The news conference in support of the pipeline came as environmental activists held vigils throughout the country on Monday to protest the pipeline, including one outside the White House attended by about 250 people. Opponents also are scheduling "pipeline meet-ups" throughout February to encourage people to raise the issue with candidates in the 2014 elections.

Joining Landrieu and Barrow at the Capitol event Tuesday were Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Mark Pryor of Arkansas. Landrieu and Pryor face tough re-election fights this year in energy-producing states where the pipeline is popular and Obama is not. Republican Mitt Romney easily carried Louisiana and Arkansas in the 2012 presidential election.

Landrieu, who is expected to become chairwoman of the Senate Energy Committee later this month, said she is "open to whatever needs to be done" to approve the pipeline, including use of the project as a bargaining chip with Republicans in upcoming talks over raising the federal debt limit.

Rep. Lee Terry, R-Neb., said GOP House leaders have no intention of attaching the pipeline to any must-pass legislation before a 90-day comment period concludes in May.

 

< back

Email   email
hide
Ebola
How worried are you about Ebola spreading?