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26-story mixed-use tower planned at Taylor & Fifth in downtown Fort Worth

Jetta Operating Co., a 24-year-old privately held oil and gas company in Fort Worth, and a related entity plan a 26-story mixed-use tower downtown at Taylor and Fifth streets on a site once owned by the Star-Telegram.

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UPDATE: Six candidates file for two Water Board seats

Six candidates have filed for the two open seats on the Tarrant Regional Water Board, setting up a battle that could potentially shift the balance of power on the board and the priorities of one of the largest water districts in Texas.

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Fort Worth breaks ground on $8.6 million South Main renovation

Fort Worth Near Southsiders and city officials broke ground Monday on the 18-month rebuild of South Main Street between Vickery Boulevard and West Magnolia Avenue.

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Body-camera maker has financial ties to former Fort Worth police chief, others

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Taser International, the stun-gun maker emerging as a leading supplier of body cameras for police, has cultivated financial ties to police chiefs whose departments have bought the recording devices, raising a host of conflict-of-interest questions.

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Fort Worth Police association planning 25,000-square-foot offices

The POA, which recently demolished its one-story building at 904 Collier St. near downtown, is planning a five-story replacement.

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AT&T cutting family wireless plans $40 in escalating price war

 

Scott Moritz
(c) 2014, Bloomberg News.


NEW YORK — AT&T, the second-largest U.S. wireless carrier, is introducing service plans aimed at families that use lots of data, cutting $40 a month from premium users' bills.

Under the new offer, families with four smartphones can pay $160 a month for 10-gigabits of shared data, unlimited calling and text messaging, the company said in a statement. A similar package under AT&T's previous plan would cost $200, and Verizon Wireless charges $260 for the same plan. The offer requires no contract, and phones must be purchased at full price either up front or in installments.

The move is an escalation of competition in the mobile market where AT&T and T-Mobile have run back-and-forth attack ads and offered $450 in credit to entice customers to switch service providers.

"This is about being competitive," said David Christopher, chief marketing officer for AT&T Mobility. "We feel we have the best network and the best value in the marketplace," Christopher said.

T-Mobile, based in Bellevue, Wash., has gained 2.1 million monthly customers in the past three quarters. This is a reversal of its 2012 performance, fueled by a switch to no- contract plans and quicker phone upgrades and payment financing. The gains at T-Mobile have helped slow AT&T's user growth. Earlier this week, the Dallas-based carrier said it signed up 566,000 contract wireless customers in the fourth quarter, compared with 780,000 a year ago.

All existing AT&T customers sharing 10-gigabits or higher will automatically be placed on the new plan, said Fletcher Cook, an AT&T spokesman.

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