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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

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Surgical complications can be unintended profit center
NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- No patient wants to experience complications after surgery. But such complications can actually lead to higher profits for hospitals if the patients are covered by Medicare or private insurance, according to a report released Tuesday by the Boston Consulting Group.
When a privately insured patient experiences one or more complications -- such as blood clots, stroke, infection, septic shock, pneumonia or cardiac arrest -- hospitals' profit margins are 330% higher compared to a patient with no complications, the report found.
For Medicare patients with complications, hospitals' profit margins are 190% higher, according to the report, which was published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.
The report isn't suggesting that complications are caused intentionally, said Dr. Barry Rosenberg, a co-author of the study. But he hopes the findings provoke discussion on the "absolute need for payment reform," he said.
Hospitals make more money the longer a privately insured or Medicare patient stays, said Rosenberg, a partner with BCG's health care practice. As a result, they may lack financial incentives to take steps to reduce surgical complications, he said.
"Insurers are rewarding hospitals when there are complications," he said. "This is not the type of incentive you want ... in the healthcare system for your family."
The BCG study analyzed insurance billing data for more than 34,000 in-patient surgeries performed in 2010 across a 12-hospital system in the southern United States. Of those surgeries, 5.3% -- or 1,820 patients -- experienced one or more complications.
Hospitals receive $56,000 in working revenues on average when a privately insured patient has a complication, but only $17,000 when they're complication-free, according to the report. They receive $3,600 when Medicare patients have a complication, vs. $1,800 when they're free of complications.
"It's been known that hospitals are not rewarded for quality, but it hadn't been recognized exactly how much more money they make when harm is done," said Dr. Atul Gawande, a professor at Harvard School of Public Health and co-author of the study, in the report. "Hospitals should financially gain, not lose, by reducing harm."
It's a different story for so-called "safety net" hospitals that primarily treat patients covered by Medicaid or who pay for their own health care. In those cases, hospitals actually make less if complications ensue because of the way Medicaid and consumers pay, according to the report.
Texas Health Resources and Ariadne Labs, a joint research center at Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital, partnered with BCG on the study.
The American Hospital Association was not immediately available for comment on the study.

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