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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Fort Worth temporarily stops issuing new home permits in TCU area

The moratorium will give a committee and the City Council time to review a proposed overlay that will pare the number of permissible unrelated adults living in the same house.

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Texas governor candidate Davis announces ed plan

 

NOMAAN MERCHANT, Associated Press


ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis made the first policy announcement of her campaign Thursday, offering proposals aimed at luring new public school teachers with guaranteed college admission, teaching jobs and loan forgiveness.

The Fort Worth state senator and presumptive Democratic nominee didn't say how much her ideas would cost. She said she would not seek a tax increase.

"Within existing state resources, I absolutely believe that we can fund and make a priority public education in the state of Texas," she said following an event at the University of Texas at Arlington. "It takes leadership and a partnership between the governor's office and her Legislature in order to make that happen, and that will be one of my priorities."

Davis sought again to tie Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, her expected Republican rival, to $5 billion in school funding cuts the Republican-controlled Legislature made in 2011 in response to a massive shortfall in state revenue. Much of those cuts were reversed during last year's session.

"I think it's a pretty clear distinction between what our focus and what our priorities are," she said.

Abbott has declined to take a position on the funding cuts, though his office is representing the state in an ongoing case brought by more than half of Texas' 1,000-plus public school districts after the cuts were made.

In an email Thursday, Abbott spokesman Matt Hirsch called Davis' proposals "fuzzy math — a plan that will increase spending and impose more mandates on Texas universities without explaining how to pay for it."

Davis said high school students in the top 20 percent of their classes should be guaranteed admission to the University of Texas at Austin or other state institutions and a job teaching in a state school after graduation.

She said the state should forgive one year of student loan debt for every teacher who works two years in a qualifying school, and that loan forgiveness should be available to potential teachers in all fields of study.

Davis said Texas teachers were underpaid and decried stories of some teachers working a second or third job to make ends meet, saying they "simply aren't earning enough." According to the National Education Association, the national teachers' union, starting Texas teachers were paid about $1,000 less than the national average during the 2011-12 academic year.

She also wants to boost the number of teacher's aides and school counselors in the state.

Two years before her 11-hour filibuster of an anti-abortion measure brought her national attention, Davis staged a filibuster in 2011 over the Republican-controlled Legislature $5 billion cuts to school funding. Much of the money cut then was restored during last year's legislative session.

____

Associated Press writer Paul J. Weber in Austin, Texas, contributed to this report.

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