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Trademark closes on 63-acre Waterside site in Fort Worth

Construction begins Oct. 20 on the development, to be anchored by a Whole Foods Market.

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UPDATE: $215M hotel, indoor ski project planned for Grand Prairie

Officials in Grand Prairie are expected later today to announce a $215 million project that will include a Hard Rock Hotel and an indoor ski facility.

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Two Fort Worth council members propose temporary single-family moratorium around TCU

The moratorium would apply to new permits for single-family homes around TCU, and give the city time to figure out what to do with a controversial proposed overlay in several neighborhoods around the university.

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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Storm costs airlines more than $100 million

Crews de-ice airplanes at Sea-Tac Airport as the Pacific Northwest recovers from a snow and ice storm that temporarily shut down operations and hundreds of flights, January 20, 2012.
Credit: CNN

Chris Isidore

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The storm and cold weather of the last week will cost the nation's airlines as much as $100 million in lost revenue and increased costs, according to an estimate from a leading airline analyst.

Helane Becker, airline analyst with Cowen and Co., said the weather would cost U.S. airlines between $50 million and $100 million in an estimate released Wednesday. Becker said the weather caused about 20,000 flights cancellations nationwide, which she said is 5,000 more flights than were canceled in due to Superstorm Sandy in 2012.

Becker does not break down the cost per airline, but she noted that JetBlue Airways was hit particularly hard by the storm. The New York-based airline had to virtually halt operations at those airports Monday afternoon into Tuesday after delays in the previous three days caused the airline to run out of pilots able to fly under new FAA rules requiring addition rest for pilots.

Related: JetBlue tries to repair the damage"Going forward we believe the airlines will adopt a more conservative approach during storms," she said. "In the past, they might take a delay; going forward they will outright cancel."

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