Join The Discussion

 

Fort Worth's new thoroughfare plan aims for more variety in street design

Fort Worth is launching a review of its master thoroughfare plan aimed at accommodating continued suburban growth and central city redevelopment with a greater variety of streets and more efficient traffic flow.

read more >

Holt Hickman, businessman who helped preserve Stockyards, dies at 82

Longtime Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and preservationist Holt Hickman died Nov. 15, 2014, at the age of 82.

read more >

UPDATE: Could American Airlines move its headquarters?

A key linchpin in the Fort Worth economy, American Airlines Group Inc., is considering sites for a new headquarters, possibly outside the city, the airline’s CEO said this morning.

read more >

Crestwood area hoping to block planned office building

Residents of West Fort Worth’s Crestwood Association are trying to block the rezoning of a small apartment complex at White Settlement Road and North Bailey Avenue to make way for a planned office building, saying it would represent the start of commercial encroachment into their neighborhood.

read more >

Tiger Woods takes a swing at Fort Worth's Dan Jenkins - in print anyway

Rarely does Golf Digest make the news. Leave it to Dan Jenkins to change that.

read more >

'Downton Abbey' ratings are way upstairs

 

Brian Stelter

CNN

(CNN) -- The "Downton Abbey" phenomenon just keeps getting bigger.

Sunday's season four premiere of the upstairs-downstairs drama on PBS broke the ratings record that was set by the premiere of season three. According to Nielsen data, at least 10.2 million viewers tuned in on Sunday night, up from 7.9 million at the start of season three.

This was more than a "personal best" for "Downton." The season four premiere outperformed every other drama on Sunday night, too. CBS's "The Good Wife," for instance, had 9.2 million viewers; ABC's "Revenge" had 6.7 million. (All these totals will increase once several days of digital video recorder viewership is factored in.)

PBS isn't rated like a traditional network because it doesn't carry traditional commercials.

But even last season's "Downton" premiere was described as one of the highest-rated events in the history of the public broadcasting network; analysts said PBS hadn't seen numbers this high since the premiere of the "Civil War" documentary series in 1990. An apples-to-apples comparison is impossible because of changes in ratings methodology. But the season four premiere affirms that "Downton" is making history for the network.

Season four, of course, debuted several months ago in the United Kingdom. PBS has received no small amount of criticism for its decision to delay the episodes in the United States, and the network's executives are aware that some fans get a sneak peek by finding the episodes illegally on the Internet. But they say the sky-high ratings two seasons in a row are proof that their scheduling strategy is a wise one.

Paula Kerger, the chief executive of PBS, said in a statement on Monday, "I'm so pleased that millions of viewers have returned to 'Downton Abbey' on their local PBS stations for what has become a post-holiday tradition."

Rebecca Eaton, the executive producer of "Masterpiece," added, "Julian Fellowes has written every word of all four seasons of 'Downton,' and I toss him a huge bouquet on behalf of his American fans."

The premiere ratings suggest "Downton" could grow to be even more popular as the season progresses. Last year 8.2 million viewers tuned in on the night of the season three finale, and more than 4 million tuned in later, for a total of 12.3 million. That's the next "personal best" for the drama to beat.

< back

Email   email
hide
Midterms
What was the message of the midterm elections?