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Group buys former Armour meatpacking site in Stockyards

The 16.8-acre site of the historic, former Armour meatpacking plant in Fort Worth’s Stockyards has changed hands, and its new owners aren’t saying anything about their plans. Chesapeake Land Development Co., which bought the site

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Dallas-Fort Worth in top five commercial real estate markets in 2015

According to the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2015 report, just co-published by PwC US and the Urban Land Institute (ULI), Dallas-Fort Worth ranks No. 5, with two other Texas cities, Houston and Austin ranking at No. 1 and 2 respectively. San Francisco ranks No. 3 and Denver No. 4.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Hulen Pointe Shopping Center sold

Hulen Pointe Shopping Center, located in southwest Fort Worth on South Hulen Street one mile south of Hulen Mall, has been purchased by Addison-based Bo Avery with TriMarsh Properties for an undisclosed price.

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Ski Grand Prairie? TCU, UTA grad helping bring snow to Metroplex

For Levi Davis last week may have been a career peak, in more ways than one.

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Federal money awarded for Dallas-Fort Worth solar energy growth
 
A. Lee Graham
Reporter
 
The North Central Texas Council of Governments has received $90,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy to help encourage solar energy development in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
 
Awarded as part of the Energy Department’s Rooftop Solar Challenge II program, the money comes as officials ask up to 30 local governments to suggest ways for making solar energy expansion easier in their respective communities.
 
Though solar hardware costs nationwide dropped from $3.28 per watt to $1.90 per watt between 2010 and 2012, permitting, inspection and other expenses known as “soft costs” remained the same at $3.32 per watt. The solar project aims to reduce solar soft costs, allowing clean energy to become more cost-effective and widespread nationwide.
 
As part of its grant work, the North Texas agency will conduct workshops and training seminars as it seeks to establish a working group of solar industry stakeholders, utility representatives and local government planners.
 
The agency plans to pursue implementation strategies for solar, relying on local government officials and industry representatives to help find the best approach for the region.
 
Officials hope the efforts achieve standardized solar practices, yielding measurable improvement in solar market conditions in Dallas-Fort Worth.

The North Central Texas Council of Governments, a voluntary association of local governments established in 1966 to assist local governments in planning for common needs, serves a 16-county region of North Central Texas. It has 240 member governments, including 16 counties, 170 cities, 24 school districts and 30 special districts.
 
More information is available at www.nctcog.org./trans.
 
lgraham@bizpress.net

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