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Obama calls for offshore drilling in Southeast

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Tuesday outlined a politically fraught plan for allowing oil and gas drilling offshore along parts of the Atlantic coast while imposing new restrictions on environmentally fragile waters off northern Alaska.

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Two from Fort Worth appointed by Gov. Abbott to university boards

Steve Hicks, a University of Texas System regent who has been a vocal opponent of regents who have criticized the system’s flagship campus in Austin, was reappointed to the board by Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday. 

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Museum District: Area’s evolution creating more interaction, public spaces

Fifteen years ago if someone had shot a cannon from Fort Worth’s world-renowned museum district, nobody would have noticed, joked Lori Eklund, senior deputy director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. But that has changed.

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Energy Transfer Partners, Regency Energy announce $18B merger

Energy Transfer Partners LP of Dallas and Regency Energy Partners LP have entered into a definitive merger agreement.

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American Airlines' first 787 Dreamliner arrives at D/FW

American is preparing the plane to begin service sometime in the second quarter.

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US approves Southwest, Virgin for LaGuardia slots

 

Southwest Airlines plane

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer


DALLAS (AP) — The government will let Southwest Airlines and Virgin America buy takeoff and landing rights at New York's LaGuardia Airport that American Airlines and US Airways agreed to sell to win approval for their merger.

The airlines disclosed Thursday that the Federal Aviation Administration had approved transfer of the rights, which are also called slots, earlier this week.

Slots are limited at the busy airport near Manhattan, making them a coveted item when they go on the market.

Last month, American and US Airways agreed to give up some of their slots at LaGuardia and Washington's Reagan National Airport to settle an antitrust lawsuit that the Justice Department filed to block their merger.

Southwest will get to keep the rights for five takeoffs and landings per day that it was already leasing from American and gain enough slots for six more daily flights. Virgin America will get enough slots for six flights per day.

In an order approving the transfers, FAA acting chief counsel Marc Warren said they were in the public interest and wouldn't reduce safety.

Dallas-based Southwest already operates at LaGuardia, but Virgin America does not. The California-based airline flies to Los Angeles and San Francisco from Newark, N.J., and to those cities plus Las Vegas from New York's Kennedy Airport.

Virgin had expressed interest in anything that American and US Airways would be forced to give up, including LaGuardia rights, said spokeswoman Abby Lunardini. She said that the airline would announce more details on where it will fly from LaGuardia in the coming weeks. Southwest did not have an immediate comment.

No announcement has been made on who will get to buy the Reagan National slots. American and US Airways also agreed to give up gates at five other airports — Los Angeles International, Boston Logan, Chicago O'Hare, Miami and Dallas Love Field.

The Justice Department sued in August to block the American-US Airways merger, which will create the world's biggest airline, saying that the deal would reduce competition and cause prices to rise. When it settled the lawsuit before trial, the department said that the takeoff and landing rights and gates that American and US Airways were giving up should go to low-cost airlines and not to big, so-called legacy carriers such United and Delta.
 

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