Join The Discussion

 

RadioShack sees stock jump on investment report

Fort Worth-based RadioShack saw its stock increase as much as 45 percent on Friday as investor Standard General LP said it was continuing talks on new financing for the electronics retailer.

read more >

Fort Worth couple gets in 'Shark Tank,' comes out with deal

A Fort Worth couple who started a business when they couldn’t sleep, were the first entrepreneurs to get a deal on ABC’s Shark Tank in the season premiere on Sept. 26.

read more >

20 from Dallas-Fort Worth on Forbes wealthiest list

There are 20 Dallas-Fort Worth residents listed among the 400 richest Americans, according to the Forbes 400 list of The Richest People in America 2014.

read more >

Internal audit says EPA mismanaged Fort Worth project

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — An internal audit by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reveals the agency mismanaged an experiment using new ways to demolish asbestos-ridden buildings.

read more >

Texas Wesleyan acquires two strip shopping centers on East Rosedale

Texas Wesleyan University has purchased two strip shopping centers on East Rosedale Street across from its Southeast Fort Worth campus, the university’s president said Friday.

read more >

Microsoft developing 'smart' bra

Microsoft researchers are developing a bra with sensors that could monitor a woman's emotional state to combat overeating.
Credit: Courtesy Microsoft

Brandon Griggs

CNN

(CNN) -- It's no longer enough to have smartphones, smartwatches, smart TVs and smart cars. Now a tech company wants to bring artificial intelligence to lingerie.

Researchers at Microsoft are developing a "smart bra" embedded with physiological sensors that would monitor a woman's heart activity to track her emotional moods and combat overeating. The sensors would signal the wearer's smartphone, which would flash a warning message to help her step away from the fridge and make better diet decisions.

So -- why a bra, exactly?

"First, we needed a form factor that would be comfortable when worn for long durations," said scientists in a research paper published online. "The bra form factor was ideal because it allowed us to collect (electrocardiogram data) near the heart."

Research has shown that many people reach for calorie-rich foods like doughnuts when they're feeling stressed, bored, discouraged or on edge. There's a reason it's called comfort food.

For the research paper, scientists from Microsoft, the University of Rochester and the University of Southampton in the UK interviewed women who said that interventions -- being alerted to their emotional states -- helped them identify triggers for emotional eating and eat a healthier diet.

The researchers then conducted a study in which four women wore the sensors in their bras for four days to monitor their vital signs. An electrocardiogram (EKG) sensor under the arm measured their heart rate, while an electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor tracked their perspiration.

More research is needed before a smart brassiere -- Microsoft's Secret, anyone? -- ever becomes a viable product. The sensors needed to be recharged every three to four hours, which limited how long the bra could be worn.

But the researchers determined the bra was mostly effective in detecting its wearer's emotional changes and, potentially, helping her eat less.

And in the future, men may not be left out.

"We will continue to explore how to build a robust, real-world system that stands up to everyday challenges with regards to battery life, comfortability, and being suitable for both men and women," the researchers said.

< back

Email   email
hide
Arena
What do you think of the new plans for a new Will Rogers arena and changes at the Convention Center?