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Fresh Ebola fears hit airline stocks

DALLAS (AP) — News that a nurse diagnosed with Ebola flew on a plane full of passengers raised fear among airline investors that the scare over the virus could cause travelers to avoid flying.

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Landscape architect behind several TCU landmarks acquired

The Dallas design firm behind several Texas Christian University projects, as well as Globe Life Park in Arlington and AT&T Stadium, has been acquired by Rvi Planning + Landscape Architecture.

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Fort Worth launching Stockyards design task force

The task force, to be chaired by the Fort Worth architect Eric Hahnfeld, would be responsible for confirming the boundaries of the city's planned Stockyards design district and reviewing the work of a consultant.

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GE rises most in year with equipment order increases, including at Fort Worth locomotive unit

NEW YORK — General Electric Co. beat analysts' profit estimates in the third quarter as Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt squeezed more costs from the manufacturing units.

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Social House Fort Worth plans to open mid-November

Social House has leased 5,045 square feet at 2801-2873 W Seventh St. in Fort Worth, according to Xceligent Inc.

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Amazon says drone deliveries are the future
 

By Gregory Wallace

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — In the not-too-distant future, Amazon deliveries could come by air directly to your doorstep.

The online mega-retailer unveiled plans on Sunday for a new delivery service called Prime Air, which uses unmanned aerial vehicles — or drones — that look like toy helicopters.

The "octocopters" aren't ready to take flight yet. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said in an interview on 60 Minutes that the drones would be ready to take flight in four to five years.

But an Amazon spokesperson pointed to an updated post on the company's website promising aerial deliveries as soon as federal rules change.

Those FAA rules could come as soon as 2015. The type of flights Bezos proposed are currently not allowed. Unlike some other drones currently used, these would be autonomous — they would fly without a pilot.

"I know this looks like science fiction. It's not," Bezos said in the CBS interview. "It drops the package. You come and get your package and we can do half-hour deliveries."

Bezos said the drone models Amazon is currently testing have a range of 10 miles and can handle products under five pounds, which is nearly 90 percent of the company's offerings.

"It won't work for everything," Bezos said. "We're not going to deliver kayaks, or table saws this way."

Amazon has long used innovative delivery strategies to gain an advantage over other retailers. Its warehouses, called fulfillment centers, are famously efficient. The company was also quick to recognize the promise of free shipping on larger purchases, and its Prime service now offers free shipping for a flat annual fee.

Other companies including pizza chain Dominos have floated the idea of using delivery drones.

All have to consider what Bezos described as a key concern: "This thing can't land on somebody's head while they're walking around their neighborhood."

 

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